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WEDNESDAY - JULY 30,  2014

QUANRUD AND JOHNSON FILE TO RUN AGAIN FOR CITY COUNCIL

Two Crookston City Council members filed to run for re-election on Tuesday at Crookston City Hall.  Bob Quanrud filed for another at large position on the Crookston City Council and Dana Johnson filed for another term in Ward 2.  As of Wednesday morning nobody has filed for the Crookston School Board.  Filings close at 5:00 p.m. on August 15.

 

 

CITY OF CROOKSTON HOLDS A STRATEGIC PLANNING SESSION ON HOUSING

The Crookston City Council and city staff met on Tuesday night for a strategic planning session on housing, using the housing survey as part of the discussion. “We shared some good ideas and had realtors, builders and stake holders in the community including the school which was helpful to the city as we make plans to go forward,” said City Administrator Shannon Stassen. “We know there is need in the rental sector and move ahead with twin homes and single homes to meet the new population coming in and for young professionals and seniors.” The group will formulate a plan and invest resources of the city that makes sense and will give return on investment and drive population in Crookston.
There is a demand for housing property in Crookston immediately. “We have a need for property in the $100,000 to $150,000 right now,” said Stassen. “The rehab program that CHEDA is currently doing is helping meet the need by rehabbing a house at $70,000 to maybe $140,000 and improving the neighborhood.”
The demand for new workers in town like teachers have a need. “There is a turn over in the community like at UMC, the school district, and RiverView so we need to have housing stock for them to put down roots,” added Stassen.
The next step is come up with a plan of action and find a place for housing in the price ranges needed by partnering with others to make it all happen.

 

 

CROOKSTON BUILDING INSPECTOR BUSY GIVING OUT NEW BUILDING PERMITS AND STORM REPAIR PERMITS

Crookston’s Building Inspector Matt Johnson has been busy this summer giving out new building permits. “We have a handful of permits for new homes in the city under construction with a few more on the plate this year,” said Johnson. “Hopefully they will be starting a strip mall on the north end in a week or two, and the Mount St. Benedict project is huge at 30,000 square feet is being framed now.”

Johnson was also busy this past week with requests for building permits to make repairs on buildings damaged during the tornado. “The storm damage has residents getting adjusters and contractors lined up and then they will come for permits,” said Johnson. They are coming for roof repairs and other house repairs as shingles and siding were damaged in the storm.”
Anyone wishing to get a permit can stop at the office in the fire hall.

 

 

CROOKSTON PARK AND REC LOOKING TO BUILD CURLING LEAGUE, LOOKING FOR FEEDBACK

Crookston Park and Recreation has set a goal to increase participation in the adult curling league for the winter of 2014/2015, and your feedback is essential to this process.  Last season 22 teams participated for eight weeks on Wednesdays, holding one afternoon session and two evening sessions.  They are looking for current and potential curlers interested in being part of their second season and helping them attain this exciting goal by calling or emailing Crookston Park and Rec at 218-281-1242, or email phagen@crookston.mn.us. Provide your name and email address.  As they develop a list of potential participants for their second season of league curling, your feedback will be integral in the formation of a potential Crookston Curling Association, dedicated to the advancement of the sport in our community.  Last year over 100 people participated in the curling league.

 

 


TRI-VALLEY OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL OFFERING EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

Tri-Valley Opportunity Council, Inc. in collaboration with Inter County Community Council (Oklee) now offers Employment and Training Programs for youth in Norman and Polk Counties. Three separate programs encompass the Employment and Training Programs. The programs are the Youth Program, Older Youth Program, and Out of School Youth Program. The Youth Program is for students’ ages 14 to 18 years old who need assistance with employment. The Older Youth Program is for ages 19 to 21 years old who need assistance with job placement and further education. The Out of School Youth Program is for those who are 16 years old or older and no longer in school but needs assistance with job training. If you have questions or would like more information on the Employment and Training Programs, please contact Nancy Ramon at 1-800-820-7263 for more information. There are eligibility requirements for the programs.
Tri-Valley Opportunity Council, Inc. is a not-for-profit community action agency headquartered in Crookston, Minn. In existence since 1965, Tri-Valley provides services in 84 counties in Minnesota and Northeast North Dakota. The mission of Tri-Valley is to provide opportunities to improve the quality of life for people and communities. For more information on services offered and job opportunities at Tri-Valley visit the website at www.tvoc.org.

 

 

 

MNDOT MOWS OVER 45,000 ACRES OF LAND ANNUALLY

Mowing the state highway rights of way is in full swing after the wet spring delayed Minnesota Department of Transportation maintenance workers from starting the job earlier. MnDOT crews mow approximately 45,000 acres of land annually.
MnDOT, like other landowners in the state, is required to control plants on the Department of Agriculture’s restricted noxious weed list. Mowing is one way MnDOT controls them. Many of the plants seen along roadsides display vibrant colors when in bloom, but to the trained eyes of MnDOT’s roadside vegetation crews, they are invasive and a threat to native plants, animals and ecosystems.  “We want a diverse plant population on our roadsides because it’s healthier to have different kinds of plants and grasses,” said Tina Markeson, roadside vegetation supervisor. “When invasive species take over, it causes issues in the long run.”
Markeson cited purple loosestrife as an example of an invasive plant that competes with native species. The invasive plant can form dense stands that replace native plants needed by wildlife for food and habitat, she said.

Mowing is usually limited to shoulders and medians to:
· Maintain sight distances for crossing and merging traffic
· Allow motorists to see approaching wildlife
· Aid in the identification of erosion issues
· Allow people to exit the vehicle if needed 

State law restricts mowing the entire right of way until after July 31 to protect ground nesting birds. Timing of the mowing is important to prevent seed formation and so plants are not moved down the road in mowing equipment. “We aim to mow when plants are in their bud stage, so we’re not spreading the seeds and making the problem worse,” Markeson said. “Knowing the weed and the timing of its development saves money so the right method or combination of methods is used at the right time.”
Some of MnDOT’s mowers have automated vehicle location systems to help maintenance crews mow around noxious weed patches. Operators use an on-screen map to mark new areas of noxious weeds and go back at the right time to mow or spray. The technology also tracks the use of herbicides, when used, so operators can better track where areas are sprayed. The technology is anticipated to reduce herbicide usage by 50 percent.
MnDOT also uses prescribed burns and biological controls to control weeds. “MnDOT’s goal is to provide a roadside environment that is ecologically appropriate and self-sustaining and maintains scenic qualities, while ensuring traveler safety,” Markeson said.
For more information, go to MnDOT’s roadside vegetation management program website, www.mndot.gov/roadsides/vegetation/.

 

 

TUESDAY - JULY 29,  2014

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL HEARS COMPLAINT ON AN UN-KEPT PROPERTY IN TOWN

The Crookston City Council met on Monday evening and the meeting was opened with Cheryl Adams, asking for help to getting neighbors next to her property on North Minnesota And East 5th to clean the trash and junk from their yards as there are rodents on the property. The Fire Department has contacted the owners and done what is possible, but it just appears to get worse and it is hard for the city to enforce the ordinances. Adams was told they would work on the problem.

The council set a public hearing for August 11 relating to the use of a five year property tax abatement for Danks & Lund LLC strip mall on the north end of Crookston.

A program income plan was approved for a rehab project. City Finance Director Angel Hoeffner said the actions were required by HUD. “When we did the Nimens-Espegard rehab small cities program they required a plan in place and they also needed an excessive force policy in place for that program,” said Hoeffner. “Section 3 is another HUD program where businesses can apply like a contractor or construction worker which need to be examined.”

Two dance permits for the Ox Cart Days were approved for the Battle of the Bands and the teen dance, all at the town square on August 15.

Public Works Director Pat Kelly said they are still cleaning up and hope to get most of the trees picked up soon so they can get to the seal coating.

Park and Recreation Director Scott Riopelle said the parks lost some trees, which have been piled up so the parks are usable. A fence at the Karn Field was blown out of place but fixed before the state tournament last weekend.

Crookston Mayor Dave Genereux read a letter from Peter Rimar at 111 McGrew Street asking for help with expenses from the storm. “Briefly he wanted the city to step up and take care of all the branches from the storm and he wanted the city to look at a micro-loan to help people with storm damage,” said Genereux. “The committee decided against the request as it is not a good business for the city and people should go to the banks.”  Rimar felt if the city had money to invest in a RV park is would be better used to contracting for debris removal. He said the Crookston Housing And Economic Development Association would be better off using money to help folks with storm damage instead of loaning money to Dawn Bjorgo for her businesses.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE HELPS OUT GOLDEN LINK, AND GIVES STASSEN A GOOD REVIEW

The Crookston Ways and Means Committee (The City Council and City Department heads) met and had a request from Golden Link officials Bob Altringer who serves as chairman and Al Chesley who is Treasurer as they had unexpected expenses when the wall in the basement next to the street collapses and cost $27,900 to repair and a handicapped bathroom was installed for $7,200 which depleted their capital fund. Council member Dana Johnson, moved and seconded by Gary Wilhite to give them $40,000 from the building Improvement fund. The Golden Link is part of the budget for Park and Recreation and they have not taken the money for many years, but now they needed help. The Ways and Committee approved the request which will go to the council. The committee turned down the request from developer Jamie Jennen of Hillsboro who asked for $16,200 for the expenses he incurred during planning for the RV campground which was not approved.

The committee held a lengthy discussion on an ordinance to allow residents to have chickens on their property and considered four options and had a four committee members for an ordinance and four people against with Gary Wilhite abstaining so the matter was dropped for the time being.

The committee finished the evening with a closed session for an evaluation of Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen. Mayor Genereux was pleased with the result. “We did review his performance and gave him some ideas and suggestions so overall it went very well.”

Mayor Genereux informed the audience that he will not seek another term as mayor and has several reasons to retire. “I have been on the council since 1987,” said Genereux. “I have served 27 years in all capacities and it is a lot of work and fatiguing. It is time for someone else to lead the council as it can be challenging. I have enjoyed the years, but it is time to do something else.”
Alderman at Large Bob Quanrud will run for another term. Dana Johnson, Tom Vedbraaten and Hector Santellanes have not decided on what they will do. People can file for a city council position in Ward 2, 4, 6 and one at large position and mayor at Crookston City Hall starting today (Tuesday, July 29). The filing fee is $2.

 

 

FILING FOR FISHER CITY COUNCIL AND MAYOR OPEN ON TODAY

Filings open for the general election, which will be held on November 4, for the City of Fisher will open on July 29 and close at 5:00 p.m. on August 12. Offices open for the City of Fisher are Mayor (2 year term), 2 City Council members (4 year term), and a Special Election for 1 City Council member (2 year term).  Affidavits of candidacy are available at the City Office located in the Fisher School.  The filing fee is $2.

 

 

 

POLK COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGER INFORMS EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS MEETING ON THE LATEST STORM DAMAGE

Jody Beauchane, Polk County Emergency Manager, spoke at the Polk County Emergency Preparedness meeting on Monday about how the storm last week affected Crookston and the county. Beauchane said it was great how everyone worked together and the how they got a lot done fast. “On Monday, July 21 about 9:00 p.m. a tornado did occur southwest of Crookston, classified as an E F2, which has winds about 115 miles an hour,” said Beauchane. “The city opened the storm shelter at city hall, the sirens were activated and code red was sent out and the tornado made its way to town and 50 some areas had power line issues and over 200 sites took damage, but no report of injuries.”
The Crookston Fire Department, Crookston Police Department and Polk County Sheriff’s Department was very active before and after the event. “The Crookston Public Works department was out dealing with the problems by 10:00 p.m. Polk County Social Services and Public Health opened up the National Guard Armory as an emergency shelter,” said Beauchane. “They were very organized and coordinated and shut down by 8:30 on Tuesday morning.”
The outlying area of Polk County had damage to buildings and trees. “There is a lot of private damage to sheds, grain bins and trees. In the strong winds, it will be homeowners insurance as government funds only cover public facilities,” said Beauchane. “A lot of contractors are working and waiting for insurance adjusters. It was just high wind damage when you get to the Fertile area and no reports of major damage from other areas of the county.”
Members of the preparedness committee felt it was a good learning activity for them as they had a plan and worked it to the end.
Businesses like Mid Valley Grain on the southwest side of Crookston had a 75 by 16 foot shed, which covered the scale, completely destroyed while a 300,650 bushel bin was dented in and the top was pulled off while other bins the same size suffered minor damage.


     Storm damage to a bin owned by Mid Valley Grain

 

 

CROOKSTON BACK TO SCHOOL REGISTRATION DAY WILL BE HELD ON THURSDAY, AUGUST 21

The Crookston Public Schools “Welcome Back to School” registration day date has been delayed one week.  It has been moved from August 14 to Thursday, August 21 due to the construction project at the Crookston High School.  Hours will be from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. in the Crookston High School Commons area.  KROX Radio will be broadcasting live starting at 7:00 a.m.


 


LONGTIME RBJ'S EMPLOYEE, KIMIKA DAHL, RETIRING AFTER 30 YEARS

After more than 30 years Kimika Dahl is retiring from RBJ’s Restaurant in Crookston. Kimika talked about the many years as a waitress for Roger Johnson and now his daughter Kim Samuelson. “Sometimes it feels like 150 years, but it is just more than 30,” said Dahl. “I came from Japan when I met and married Don Dahl from Crookston and have lived here for 44 years.” Dahl has worked through two fires and one move at RBJ’s. “It was plenty of work and were I have a lot of friends and I will miss all of them,” said Dahl, who said she might have to come back for a visit and have coffee, and travel plans are still a ways off.
Everyone is welcome to say farewell during the week and put something in the tip jar and get a free cup of coffee and cupcake.

 

 

 

MONDAY - JULY 28,  2014

CROOKSTON CITY COUNCIL AND WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE MEET TONIGHT

The Crookston City Council meets at 7:00 p.m. tonight (Monday) at the Crookston City Council Chambers.  The consent agenda includes setting a public hearing for a five year property tax abatement for Danks and Lund LLC, owners of a strip mall on North Acres, while they are looking at building another strip mall next to the current mall.  The adoption of a program income plan to assist the rehabilitation of the Nimens-Espegaard Apartment along with the adoption of the Housing Section 3 plan for the duration of the apartment project.  An excessive force policy is required by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development for the small cities development grant, which the city has applied for.  The meeting is open to the public.

The Crookston Ways and Means will meet following the Crookston City Council meeting and the last part of the meeting will be closed for an evaluation of Shannon Stassen, the Crookston City Administrator.

 

 

 

FILING FOR CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD, CITY COUNCIL AND MAYER WILL OPEN ON TUESDAY

Filings open for the general election, which will be held on November 4, for the City of Crookston and Crookston School District will open on July 29 and close at 5:00 p.m. on August 12.

Offices open for the City of Crookston are Mayor, City Council spots in Wards 2, 4, 6 and one at large position.  Anybody interested can file at Crookston City Hall.

Three members will be elected to the School Board for terms of four years each. The district has three board member positions up for election.  Keith Bakken, Tim Dufault and Adrianne Winger's spots are up for election.  Affidavits of candidacy are available from the school district clerk, at 402 Fisher Ave., Suite 593, Crookston, MN., or stop by the Crookston High School District Office by using door 10 on the east side of the high school. The filing fee for this office is $2. A candidate for this office must be an eligible voter, must be 21 years of age or more on assuming office, must have been a resident of the school district from which the candidate seeks election for thirty (30) days before the general election, and must have no other affidavit on file for any other office at the same primary or next ensuing general election.
The affidavits of candidacy must be filed in the office of the school district clerk and the filing fee paid prior to 5:00 p.m. on August 12, 2014.

 

 

MNDOT HOSTS PRE-CONSTRUCTION MEETING TO DISCUSS THE WEST SIXTH STREET SLIDE PROJECT

The Minnesota Department of Transportation hosted a pre-construction meeting at city hall on Wednesday afternoon to give people an opportunity to ask question about the work planned to stop the slide into the river on Sixth Street. Tim Lasher, engineer and project manager for Nicholson Construction said there are many components to the unique project. “We need to think about how we are going to correct the slope as well as the impact on the neighborhood and Highway 2,” said Lasher. “Our time line is on schedule as we are doing design work, documenting the design and then start construction in August.” They want to get the excavation work done this fall and the sheer walls in with a regrade to follow and in the spring they will spread top soil and do the planting of trees and grass.

Jim Bittman, MnDOT engineer from Bemidji said the purpose of the job is to save Highway 2. “We have to protect Highway 2 from failure and it is time to address the slide problems, we have been testing the movement of the slide,” said Bittman. “MnDot does not have a ton of projects like this one but is also a design built project that is wide open for the contractors to make it work, it is easier and cheaper to do this project and save Highway 2 than to replace the highway.”

Rick Deschampt, an engineer with Nicholson Construction in Pittsburgh, said it is an interesting project and not repetitive with special significance to Crookston. “I like designing new things. The slide has been moving about seven inches a year when I looked at the data being collected,” said Deschampt. “The area of the slope is 900 to 1,000 feet along the river and about 250 to 300 feet from the river to the road The walls being put in will be about 100 feet long and 3 feet thick and 75 feet deep.”
A special machine will be hauled in to do the job and has a 100 foot boom and special to do the excavating, the machine is worth millions of dollars so when it arrives the weather should be good so the work can be done. “We will probably write a technical paper when we are done because it is unique and publish it so Crookston will be famous with all us nerdy engineers for a long time to come,” said Deschampt.
There are several engineers working on this project from the state, Brierley Associates of Burnsville and Nicholson Construction of Pittsburgh.

 

 

 

CRAFTY GRANNY STORE NOW OPEN IN CROOKSTON

Crafty Granny, a new business in Crookston, opened on Crazy Days at the former Prescription Shoppe on Main Street, with the owner Nanette Wilson. “My new store is called Crafty Granny and I am a grandma with a grandson and one coming in September,” said Wilson. “I recently got a lot of crafts and now we have homemade items from all the consigners in the area and I sell them. Two people, Megan and Cindy, help out now and I work after my job at the Developmental Achievement Center.” Hours are 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday - Friday and Saturday they are open from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m..
Wilson said crafters can consign their items in the shop and she invites everyone to stop in and check out the merchandise.

 

 

CROOKSTON ALL SCHOOL REUNION STILL RECEIVING DONATIONS HELPING COVER COSTS OF EVENT

The Crookston All School Reunion Committee met last week and reviewed the activities of the event. Wayne Melbye, chairman of the committee, said there were good events and some that events that did not go so well. “We decided we had a great reunion, we went through the numbers and comments, some things went well and Mother Nature didn’t help much,” said Melbye. “All the businesses had a good week, downtown retail, bars, restaurants, hotels, the golf course, and we were busy at Ampride. Financially we are not as bad off as we thought and still have some money coming in. We resubmitted to Convention Visitors Bureau as they only had about a thousand dollars when we submitted and now they have a new budget and liked how the event went.”
Money is still being collected and donations from local establishment have been coming in to help pay for the event.
The committee had borrowed $10,000 from the Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority which will be paid back.


 

 

THE FILM IF YOU BUILD IT WILL BE SHOWN AT UMC ON WEDNESDAY EVENING AT BEDE BALLROOM

The film “If You Build It” will be shown at a free public screening on Wednesday, July 30 at 8:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargent Student Center, University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC). Tickets are not required. The independent documentary chronicles two designers as they lead rural North Carolina teens through a year-long, full-scale design and build project that does much more than just teach basic construction skills: it demonstrates how design thinking, an innovative yet practical approach to problem solving, can re-invent not just these teens’ down-on-its-luck town but their own sense of what's possible.
Slate called “If You Build It” “A heartening story about the power of design. Variety, reviewed it as “Well crafted and unexpectedly moving.” Salon said it was “Provocative, inspiring ...” Director Michael Creadon is best-known for the quirky “Wordplay,” a film that told the story of a crossword puzzle championship interspersed with clips of well-known Americans, such as former President Bill Clinton and filmmaker Ken Burns, who regularly solve crosswords.
The University of Minnesota Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships (RSDP) are sponsoring the screening as part of a rural design conference, which will use design thinking to explore a number of challenges and opportunities facing rural communities. The conference, titled Thriving by Design II, is sponsored by RSDP (part of UMN Extension); UMN Center for Rural Design; University of Minnesota Crookston; EDA Center at the University of Minnesota Crookston; and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota Center for Prevention. More information on the conference is available at http://z.umn.edu/rdcii.

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY - JULY 25,  2014

CROOKSTON INN PATIENTLY AWAITING THE ARRIVAL OF HOTEL IMPOSSIBLE SHOW CREW TO HELP THEM OUT

The Crookston Inn and Convention Center is owned by Todd and Nicole Jacobson and they are waiting patiently for the television show Hotel Impossible to decide when they are coming to Crookston to do a show to be shown next year. “I know I have been working for the past year to get Hotel Impossible to come and tape an episode and they have finally agreed to do an episode for the new season,” said Todd. “They want us to be surprised as to when they come and don’t want us prepared. They want to see what is actually happening and not candy coat anything for them. They want day to day operations, so we all have to be patient and wait for them to show up,”
In the mean time Jacobson and his staff keep busy with the events scheduled daily.

 

 

CROOKSTON VFW LOOKING TO REOPEN ON AUGUST 1, LOOKING FOR HELP CLEANING UP SATURDAY

The Crookston VFW has been working hard to get the club open again after being closed for a short time. Ron Delage is the commander and said volunteers are stepping up to help. “We are trying to reopen on August 1 with volunteers from the post and the auxiliary,” said Delage. “We need a couple more so they only have to work one day a week. This will save a half a payment a month and help pay off the $15,000 owned to creditors and about $30,000 in taxes so with the volunteers we will pick some up.”
Pam Delage, Crookston VFW Auxiliary President said they are planning a clean up for Saturday. “We will start with the clean up on Saturday, get more light fixtures up to make it brighter,” said Delage. “We are going to keep going and plan to have a DJ on August 1 and 2, who has donated his time for the opening so we hope the community will support us.”
Anyone wishing to help should contact the Delage’s or show up on Saturday to help out.
If you can't help on Saturday, but wish to send donations, send them to: Crookston VFW Post 1902, P.O. Box 333, Crookston, MN 56716. For more info, call Ron DeLage, (218) 289-5076. 

 

 

33 MEMBERS OF BIKE AND BUILD MAKE A STOP IN CROOKSTON

33 young adults with Bike and Build, a national non profit committed to supporting affordable housing are bicycling across the United States and were in Crookston Wednesday and Thursday staying at the Wesley United Methodist Church. The cyclists pedaled from Portsmouth, New Hampshire to Vancouver, British Columbia in order to raise money and awareness for affordable housing causes.

Megan Schmidt is from New Hampshire and said they needed the rest as they head out this morning. “We should be in Vancouver in about a month and have been on the road for more than a month,” said Schmidt. “We will travel 116 miles on Friday which is the longest day so it will be a big test and a proud moment when we finish.”

Hannah Livingston came from Portland, Oregon and was loving her experience. “This is my first time and I absolutely love it, Being able to seeing everything at 15 miles an hour is totally different,” said Livingston. “You are much more a part of the environment and hear and see things you would not normally see and you make a lot of new friends.”

265 riders have been committed to Bike and Build this summer as they travel for 10 weeks and help to build affordable housing in nine locations. Each rider raised $4,500 to help fund the trip and collectively raise over $500,000 for housing organizations.


Bike and Build participants working on their bikes

 

 

IMMUNIZATIONS WILL BE THE TOPIC FOR RIVERVIEW HEALTH'S JULY 31 HEALTH LUNCHEON

Immunizations. Who needs them? Why? Which ones? When? Immunizing your child can be confusing. As a parent, you might have questions and concerns about vaccine safety. With so much incorrect information on the Internet and in the media, it is often hard to find trustworthy, clear, and up-to-date information.
At RiverView’s July 31 Health Luncheon, Meghan Updike, DNP-C, will walk you through the history of immunizations, their mechanism of action, current recommendations and present controversy surrounding their use in children.
Vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Yet many parents still question their safety because of misinformation they’ve received. That’s why it’s important to turn to a reliable and trusted source, including your child's healthcare provider, for information.
Preventing 14 Childhood Diseases
Over the years some of the most devastating diseases that affect children have been greatly reduced or eradicated completely thanks to vaccination. Today we protect children from 14 dangerous childhood diseases through immunizations, yet some diseases are back in the news.
U.S. measles cases are at a 20-year high this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported in June. As of May 30, the agency had received reports of 334 measles cases in 18 states.
Nearly all of the outbreaks involved unvaccinated people who brought measles back after a trip overseas, the CDC said. Those outbreaks could have been prevented.
Attend the July Health Luncheon and let Updike answer your questions and help you make informed decisions with regard to this very important component of pediatric health care.
Health Luncheon Details
The luncheon will be held in Meeting Room # 1 beginning at noon. Meeting Room # 1 is located near the RiverView Clinic entrance on the north side of the hospital and across from the elevators on first floor.
The luncheon series is in its sixteenth year of sponsorship by RiverView Health. All men and women interested in improving their health are invited to attend. Each luncheon starts a few minutes past noon and luncheons are kept under one hour so those needing to return to work can attend. The presentations are free and attendees can bring their own lunches or purchase a bag lunch for $3.00. Pre-registration is required. Call Holly Anderson at 218-281-9745 to reserve a seat.

 

 

POLK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO HOST MINNESOTA ON THE MAP TRAVELING EXHIBIT

The Polk County Historical Society will host Minnesota On the Map, a traveling exhibit. It will be on display at the Carnegie Building on Ash Street in Crookston Mondays and Thursdays from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. (except Labor Day) from August 4 to September 29. Minnesota on the Map features dozens of maps ranging from Louis Hennepin’s 1683 map of the upper Mississippi River Valley to a satellite map of Minnesota produced by NASA.
Minnesota on the Map illustrates how maps have documented and helped influence understanding of the state, from early exploration to the present.
Drawing from the extensive map collection of the Minnesota Historical Society, the exhibit features 23 reproduction maps and atlases, a video station with commentary by local historians and a bin of laminated maps that allows for an up-close look at Minnesota geography and history. 
An oversized jigsaw puzzle map of the state will be available for children. Other children's activities include a Minnesota Icons Postcard activity along with Mythical Maps for children to collage three-dimensional landscapes and create their own maps.
The exhibit is free and everyone is encouraged to get a birds eye view of Minnesota then and now, and is on temporary loan from the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul and will be traveling to venues throughout Minnesota. 
The Polk County Historical Society secured the exhibit through a grant made possible by funds from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

 


 

MOTORISTS TRAVELING BY ST. HILAIRE ON COUNTY HIGHWAY 3 WILL EXPERIENCE A DETOUR STARTING MONDAY

Motorists on County Highway 3 adjacent to Highway 32 in northwestern Minnesota will experience a detour of the St. Hilaire railroad crossing when it closes on Monday, July 28. Work is expected to continue through the end of the week. Crews will be replacing the old rubber crossing with a concrete surface for improved safety and ease of maintenance. The detour from west of St. Hilaire on County Highway 3 will direct motorists north on County Highway 12, and then east on County Highway 7. Motorists will then proceed south on Highway 32 to St. Hilaire.
For statewide travel information, visit www.511mn.org.        

 

 

 

THURSDAY - JULY 24,  2014

CITY CREWS CONTINUE TO CLEAN UP AFTER THE STORM, COULD TAKE A MONTH BEFORE EVERYTHING IS CLEANED UP

Pat Kelly, Crookston Public Works director, said clean up by the city crews is moving ahead but it will take a long time. “We have been very busy and the guys are putting in extra time,” said Kelly. “Water, park and street divisions are doing a heck of a job, even if it doesn’t look like it. We will be going back as it could take a couple of rounds. We are trying to get the big stuff now, and we can see the difference in the Woods Addition.”

The crews are cutting up some of the big trees and then use the front end loader and putting them on the trucks to take to the burn site where a worker has another loader to unload. “Many people are bring stuff out to the burn site,” said Kelly. “That helps us out so we really appreciate the whole community helping out.”

Lift stations are now operational. “There is one lift station that had the alarm system struck by lightning but the last two stations got power from Otter Tail Power last Tuesday in the Wood’s Addition,” said Kelly. “There is temporary power from Red Lake Electric for the lift station by the Crookston Sports Center, so everything is running now.”

Clean up could take months to get it fully cleaned up. “We will keep going until mid August and then we have to do some seal coating, but by then we should be in good shape,” added Kelly.

The city burn site, north of American Crystal Sugar, will remain open the rest of the week for anyone wishing to haul their trees and other tornado damaged items themselves.

 

 

OTTERTAIL POWER HAS POWER BACK ON TO ALL AREAS OF CROOKSTON

Leon Kremeier, manager of Otter Tail Power Company in Crookston said the crews are still working, but everyone has power except for those who need an electrician. “We have all the customers back on unless they need an electrician who is needed to get the power back hooked on to the house and when that is done we will get it on quickly,” said Kremeier.  “The extra crews are still working with about 40 people working from all over and they were a good group of guys working,” said Kremeier. “The Crookston Fire Department and city crews who were very helpful.”
Kremeier said Ottertail Power customers can call 1-800-257-4044 or stop at the office with questions or concerns.

 

 

SOME BUSINESSES SEEING MORE TRAFFIC BECAUSE OF THE STORM

Many businesses in Crookston are busy since the storm on Monday evening.   Craig Buckholz at Hardware Hank was busy with customers and remodeling. “Storms always change what the customers want or need,” said Buckholz. “They need chain saws,   things to chop wood and pile, generators to keep the power. Tracy and Bruce have been busy while I’m working on remodeling.”

Wes Cameron at Crookston Building Center had a full parking lot and the phones were ringing when KROX stopped in. “There are a lot of customers coming for shingles, and windows and they keep finding damage as the time goes along and contractors are coming in now,” said Cameron. Contractors are busy trying to fix up homes before the next rain fall.

 

 

CROOKSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT BAND DEPARTMENT TO HOLD A BEGINNING BAND INFORMATIONAL MEETING FOR FIFTH GRADERS

The Crookston Public Schools' Band Department is holding a beginning band informational meeting for families of incoming fifth grade students. All fifth graders interested in playing an instrument are encouraged to attend. Please sign up online at www.crookstonmusic.org and attend the beginning band info night on Tuesday, July 29 at 6:00 p.m. at RBJ's Restaurant. 

 

 

CHEDA DISCUSSES HELPING THE JENNEN'S WITH SOME EXPENSES AFTER RV PARK FELL THROUGH

The Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority (CHEDA) met this morning and discussed a request from Jeremy and Sarah Jennen who had a bill for the expenses incurred during the work on getting a recreational campground in the city.  “Actually I asked them to clarify their expenses above the normal course of business and we had so many months of discussion and debate,” said Craig Hoiseth, CHEDA Executive Director.  “The expenses were $16,200 and CHEDA discussed the issue and decided not to pay the expenses, but the board split with some wanting to pay half. Jennen’s are still interesting in having a RV park in Crookston and many local people want a park, but now is will just cost us more.” 

Willie Nephew owns a trailer park on the northeast corner of Crookston and has signed a contract with American Crystal Sugar to have the workers who come from out of town and are camping.

The site of the former Professional Building is once again for sale at a set price of $25,000.  Hoiseth said CHEDA is still interesting in purchasing the property.  “Our intention is still purchase at $25,000 unless someone else wants to give them more money good for them to make more money.”

The CHEDA approved a loan request from Dawn Bjorgo for Cofe to expand the business.  The loan is for $40,000 at four percent interest for a five year payback.

 

 

OX CART DAYS TO HOLD A TWO DAY MARKETPLACE, REGISTER NOW

Crookston’s Ox Cart Days Festival, set for August 13 -17, will feature a two-day Marketplace. The Marketplace will be held on Saturday, August 16, starting at 12:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, August 17, at 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. on the Ox Cart Days Festival Grounds on the Downtown Square. Organizers are seeking a variety of vendors, including arts and crafts, antiques, fresh produce, and/or other unique items attractive to festival visitors.
The Ox Cart Days Marketplace will be held outdoors, rain or shine. Space will be reserved on a first come-first served basis. The registration fee is $25 for a 10 X 10 space. Registration received after July 31 the cost will be $30 per space.
Marketplace information and registration forms are available online at www.visitcrookston.com, by calling the Crookston Area Chamber of Commerce at (218)281-4320, or by email at skegler@visitcrookston.com.
The Ox Cart Days Festival Committee reserves the right to reject any vendor whose products might be deemed inappropriate for the event.

 

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO OFFER FREE IMPACT BASELINE CONCUSSION TESTING IN RLF

Chances are you’ve seen the back-to-school advertisements with the latest backpack styles and deals on pencils. Yes, it is time to start thinking about getting your family ready for fall and everything it brings with it. It’s time to get your athletes in for sports physicals. It’s also time for those athletes to get their ImPACT Baseline Concussion Testing done with RiverView Health. RiverView will be offering FREE ImPACT testing in Red Lake Falls on Wednesday, Aug 6th and Wednesday, Aug. 13th. Appointments are being taken for 5, 6, and 7 PM by calling 218-253-4606.

Traumatic Brain Injury
A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth.
Even with today’s advanced safety equipment, preventing a concussion is impossible. Fortunately, there have been advances in diagnosing and treating a concussion. One of the most popular concussion management programs is ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing), used by RiverView Health. ImPACT is also used by many professional and amateur teams, including the National Football League and Major League Baseball.
Gone are the days of a coach holding fingers up in front of a player’s face and asking them how many they see, only to send the player back out into play if he or she guesses correctly. Today ImPACT provides invaluable information that can help take the guesswork out of concussion management and promote safe return-to-play decisions for athletes.
RiverView Health’s, Marie Johnstad, coordinator of the Speech-Language Department, and Physical Therapist Rhonda Salentiny, administer the ImPACT computerized assessment to document an athlete’s neurocognitive functioning before the sports seasons begin. If a possible concussion occurs, after the athlete has seen his or her primary caregiver, another ImPACT test is done to determine any damage since the baseline testing. The computerized program evaluates and documents multiple aspects of neurocognitive functioning, including verbal and visual memory, attention span, brain processing speed, reaction time, and post-concussive symptoms. The user-friendly injury documentation system enables medical providers and therapists to track the injury from the field and through the recovery process. An athlete is usually cleared to go back to play after favorable ImPACT results. ImPACT baseline testing is repeated every two years by all athletes to take into account cognitive development.

Free Baseline Testing
The baseline testing is free for area athletes thanks to funds from the United Way, RiverView Health Auxiliary and RiverView Health.  “Without the United Way and the Auxiliary we wouldn’t be able to offer this very important program,’’ Johnstad shared. “The news is full of stories of athletes suffering concussions. The Centers for Disease Control mandates that states, schools, sports leagues and organizations have policies or action plans on concussions in youth and high school sports. While these policy efforts show some promise, more research is needed to help protect children and teens from concussion and other serious brain injuries.’’
While ImPACT is mostly used in our area for high school athletes, Johnstad said she has also used ImPACT on younger and older patients, including a seven-year-old who hit his head on the ice and a highway employee who needed the testing done to determine when he could go safely back to work.
For more information on RiverView’s ImPACT Concussion Management Program, contact Marie Johnstad at 218-281-9463.

Did you know?
- A
concussion is a brain injury that frequently involves physical as well as cognitive symptoms.
- About 10 percent of all student athletes in contact sports suffer a concussion during their season.
- Recovery may take days or weeks, with individuals often experiencing dizziness, headaches, double vision, memory problems, irritability and depression.
- Premature return to play following a concussion can lead to potentially serious consequences.
- P
roper management of the injury is the first step in avoiding long-term complications.
 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY - JULY 23, 2014

WOODS ADDITION WITHOUT POWER FOR ONE MORE DAY

Crookston Fire Chief Tim Froeber and Otter Tail Power Company has informed KROX Radio that they will not be able to restore power in the Woods Addition Tuesday. Otter Tail Power plans to start working at 5 a.m. today (Wednesday). They apologize for any inconvenience and hope to have everything up and running today (Wednesday).

 

MORE STORM DAMAGE PICTURES SUBMITTED TO KROX RADIO

KROX Radio has received a lot of storm damage pictures and will be posting the ones we have received the past 24 hours below.  You can click on the link to see more of the latest pictures.


Eight Ottertail Power trucks at the the corner of Holly Ave. and Hurlbut Street in he Woods Addition getting ready to turn the lines back on after approximately 22 hours without power. (Picture by Brandon Boetcher)


Christian Brothers Ford in Crookston had the front of the building and several cars damaged

FOR MORE SUBMITTED STORM PICTURES CLICK HERE

 

 

POLK COUNTY BUILDINGS HIT BY THE STORM MONDAY NIGHT CAUSING SEVERAL PROBLEMS

Polk County Commissioners learned of the damage done to some county facilities during the storm on Monday evening. “The county had some difficulties,” said Whiting. “There was noticeable movement on the roof at the Justice Center, it appears the fabric lifted and went down moving the gravel all around so we need to figure out what it all means so we will contacting the insurance company.” The government center didn’t have power, which knocked out the internet for the code red. “We believe the tower at the Law Enforcement Center was hit by lightning which knocked out radio communication,” added Whiting. The dispatch center had no problems and they handled a large number of calls.

 

 

POLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HAVE A BUSY MEETING AND DISCUSS SEVERAL ITEMS

Polk County Commissioners approved a request from the City of Crookston to waive the tipping fees for a demolition project. Commissioner Craig Buness said the county and city will work together. “It is the former Crookston Paint and Glass building on Robert Street, the building could have come back to the county so we elected to waive the tipping fees for the city.” The city purchased the building and will demolish it to make a parking lot which will benefit everyone involved. “It was a project where government can work together,” added Buness.

Myron Jesme, manager of the Red Lake Watershed District and board members Gene Tiedemann, and Albert Mandt came before the commissioners with their annual report and progress on the Grand Marais Creek project. “The commissioners always want to get information on the watershed activities and get answers to our questions,” said Buness. “We had an update on tiling projects by the farmers and their financial status.” The Watershed Grand Marias cut channel stabilization project is being done at a total cost of $1,036,567.04. The watershed contributed $183,418.38 to the project which involves six miles.

The Polk County Sheriff’s Department is replacing their boat after approval from the commissioners. “The old boat needs to be replaced and we got a federal safety grant of $22,000 and the department will put in $5,000 to $6,000 so the board approved the purchase of the boat to be used on the county lakes for safety purposes,” said Buness.

The Justice Center needs to repair the boilers as they have had problems since May, 2014. They called for quotes to be opened on July 14 and only got one quote, from Lunseth Plumbing and Heating, at a cost of $40,602.90 which we accepted as the work needs to be done soon.”

Bacon Dray Lines of Erskine has come current in the solid waste management tax owed to the Minnesota Department of Revenue and they have established a payment plan after which they will be in compliance and their license with Polk County will be determined.

Polk County Commissioners met on Tuesday and approved the purchase of furniture for the law enforcement offices where the Information Service Department computer people are moving after the remodeling is completed. Polk County Administrator Chuck Whiting said they received two bids, with North Country Business Products was the low bidder at $70,927.60. The remodeling and furniture installation should be in place in September.

The commissioners approved two loans for septic systems working with the Planning and Zoning office. Raymond and Eileen Kaster of Fertile were approved for a septic fix up loan of $4,990.00 with the work to be done by Olson and Sons Excavating of Fertile. Terrence Gross of Crookston was approved for a fix up loan of $7,200 with the septic system to be installed by Olson and Sons Excavating of Fertile. The applicant will pay 10 percent down and pay the remaining balance over a ten year term. Funds for the septic system loan program came through the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency from the Clean Water Act.

Tammy Sykes, Director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, came before the board with a report and appropriation request for $2,000. Polk County has 321 active volunteers in the RSVP program which spent 23,670 hours volunteering. Each hour is valued at $22.55 therefore the county got $533,759.00 of free work from the volunteers. The county board will take their request as part of their study for the 2015 county budget.

 

 

 


CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD APPROVES TWO POLICY CHANGES IN THE TRANSPORTATION

Two changes were approved by the Crookston School Board in the transportation policies. Crookston School District Transportation Supervisor Rick Niemela said the drug and alcohol policy was changed. “We changed the policy to come in line with federal mandates so we needed to list the person they could contact if they had any questions so we put it down as the transportation director,” said Niemela. “Now if personnel changes we don’t have to change the policy.”
The other policy change deals with physicals. “If a medical need arises and causes the district concern we can request a physical of an employee so we know they can medically do their job,” said Niemela.
Niemela said the district can use more school bus drivers for the coming year. Anyone interested may call him at the bus garage at 281-5444.

 

 

 

TUESDAY - JULY 22,  2014

SEVERE STORMS KNOCK POWER OUT OF MOST HOMES IN CROOKSTON, DOWNTOWN WITHOUT POWER ALL NIGHT

Crookston and the area was hit with by a powerful storm Monday evening.  The National Weather Service said a funnel cloud was spotted by Crookston just before 9:00 p.m. and a KROX listener called and said they spotted a funnel cloud about five miles west of Crookston while traveling the KT road.  Winds of over 80 miles per hour were reported by a weather station in Crookston, according to Tom Graffenauer of the National Weather Service in Grand Forks. The storm had some straight line winds that knocked trees down onto power lines causing a power outage for most of Crookston.  Ottertail Power Company crews were working overnight to restore power to the Woods Addition and Downtown Crookston to name a few.  

Storm damage is being assessed throughout Crookston this morning and Proulx Refrigeration, Heating, and Appliance took a direct hit on the southwest corner of their building where the roof was gone. “ Last night when I stopped the shingles and plywood were gone off part of the roof and this morning the sheet rock had fallen on the appliances in the show room,” said Craig Larson. “Insulation is on the trucks and side of the building, so it is a mess."  You can see pictures of the damage below.

With the power outage in Crookston some of the lift stations in the city were without power. “The south end of town got hit pretty good and our lift stations were out of power, some were running on generator, and one was struck by lightning,” said Crookston Public Works Director Pat Kelly. “The crews worked to open the streets, except for two of them which had power lines in the trees and I did not want the crews getting into that.” Crews are busy today getting trees off the boulevards. If you have trees down, try and get them to the boulevard,” said Kelly. “We will try to get all the streets open and get some sense of normalcy.”
Kelly is asking people to be patient and stay away from the power lines. “We have a system set up and won’t be running all over time,” said Kelly. “We have opened up the burn site to the public from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for the next few days and we will have someone manning the site. If you have a trailer or truck you can haul to the burn site and dispose of it.”
The Crookston burn site is located on the north side of America Crystal Sugar by the city ponds.

The Crookston Fire Department had a busy Monday night and are doing assessments this morning. “After the storm came through we sent the crews out to make assessments on blocked streets, where power lines were down and damage done,” said Crookston Fire Chief Tim Froeber. “We had assistance from the Crookston Police Department, Fireman’s Association, and Department of Natural Resources. We ran the emergency center from the fire department, we mapped the hazards on the street and kept in contact with the public works department. Power lines were down, transformers were on fire so there were a lot of hazards around town that continues so we want people to be careful.”
Fire calls came in after the power went out. “The alarm systems sounded and we checked them out, the main calls were about power lines stuck in trees causing arcing. There were no structure fires, just power issues” said Froeber. “There were no serious injuries that we know of, and we opened the National Guard Armory at midnight and went door to door to those without power to let them know.”
The firemen checked on the trailer parks where there was some damage and Otter Tail Power worked to get many parts of town back on, but they will be working throughout the day.

The Crookston Fire Department is offering some tips to stay safe after the storm.  The tips are listed below-
1. Stay away from downed power lines and treat them as they are live.
2. Watch out for branches still hanging in trees (widow makers)
3. Stay clear of trees that are leaning or on a structure.
4. Stay away from buildings that are heavily damaged
5. Be aware of water on the roadway as areas could be washed out
6. Make sure your neighbors are okay
7. If you smell natural gas, call the gas company at 1-877-267-4764 and the fire department at 281-4584.
8. If you see any suspicious activities call the police department at 281-3111.
9. Limit sightseeing

KROX was out and about Tuesday morning after things calmed down and was taking pictures of some of the damage.  You can see the pictures below and for more pictures click the link.  If you have storm damage pictures you would like to share send them to krox@rrv.net


 An R.V. trailer was picked up and rested against a storage facility!!!! 

 


             Proulx Refrigeration, Heating and Appliance's building was damaged by the storm and a view through the window of the building


17 railcars were blown over by the wind between Mid Valley Grain and American Crystal Land (Submitted picture)


   Ampride Convenience Mart's canopy was hit by the high winds Monday night


A sidewalk is pushed up by roots of a tree that was blown to a slant in the Woods Addition


                                                        A big tree uprooted in the Woods Addition on Monday night

FOR MORE STORM PICTURES CLICK HERE

 

FOR THE OBITUARY PAGE  CLICK HERE

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