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FRIDAY - NOVEMBER 21,  2014

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMEN FIND A CHANGE UP IN HEALTH

Freshmen at Crookston  High School have a change in their health curriculum this year, according to health teacher and Dean of Students Josh Hardy. “We are doing a new thing for health this year in ninth grade instead of a semester of health they will receive four full days of health each year until they are seniors which is 16 days of health , 8 hours each day, which is about 128 hours in place of a semester long class, doing things like this allows us to bring people in from the community,” said Hardy.  “Mental health was the theme for the day this week with specialists like Travis Knutson from the Northwest Mental Health Center, Jill Carlson our school psychologist,  Leah Kent our counselor, Bethany Brandvold from Polk County Public Health, Kay Williams who does Yoga at UND and I participated also. The students rotated through and got presentations and creative health things and the students seemed to have a good day with the girls liking the yoga more than the boys but I was pleased with the first time experience.”
Hardy is  will be getting health specialists from throughout the state to participate in their monthly Health Fair.



CROOKSTON CITY TASK FORCE WILL MEET ON TUESDAY MORNING, CITY COUNCIL WILL HAVE REGULAR MEETING ON MONDAY NIGHT

The Crookston Sports Center Task Force meets on Tuesday at 7:00 a.m. in the  Crookston City Council Chambers in the Crookston City Hall. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss ice rental fees for the spring and summer ice at the sports center which is rented by the Crookston Blue Line Club.

The Crookston City Council will have their regular meeting on Monday, November 24 at 7:00 PM in the council chambers. For the council meeting agenda, click here. Immediately following the council meeting, the Crookston Ways and Means committee meet.

The ways and means agenda:
1. Approve/Amend meeting reports from October 27, 2014 and November 10, 2014
2.  Request for an extension on Barrette Street Lot
3.  Create new Internal Service Fund
4.  Budget Discussion
5.  Other
Both meetings are open to the public.

 


CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD WILL HEAR ABOUT THE FINAL AUDIT FOR 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR AND BE ASKED TO APPROVE IT

The Crookston School will hear about the final audit for the past school year from Kim Durbin, CPA at Drees, Riskey and Vallager in Crookston. The board will also be asked to approve the audit. Other agenda items include approving contracts for the past year through 2017 for the custodial staff and also Transportation Director, Rick Niemela for the past year through 2017.  The board will accept over $1,700 from businesses and citizens for a volleyball system at Highland and $6,400 from the Crookston Youth Basketball Association (CYBA) going toward the gym floor at the high school and for the Crookston Girls and Boys basketball programs. For the full agenda, click here.
The board meeting starts at 5:00 PM and is open to the public. There are two points at the board meeting citizens can address the board, immediately after the opening and just before the close.


 

MINNESOTA CROP IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION TO HOLD ANNUAL MEETING IN JANUARY

The 2015 Minnesota Crop Improvement Association (MCIA) Annual Meeting will be held January 13 and 14 at the Bigwood Event Center in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. An informative program, industry trade show and Awards Banquet has been planned for seed producers and processors.

Meeting highlights include:
-Awards Banquet, January 13 will feature Dr. Jim Orf as he reflects on his career of over 30 years as soybean breeder at the University of Minnesota.  From the broad usage of publically developed varieties, the adoption of bio-technology and growth of food grade soybeans - his career spans a period of dramatic change in the soybean seed industry.

-How Will Sequencing the Soybean Genome Impact Plant Breeding?
presented by Dr. Robert Stupar of the University of Minnesota.  Learn how advancements in genomics research will yield major benefits for plant breeders and variety improvement. 
-Barley Breeding at the University of Minnesota by Dr. Kevin Smith.  The University of Minnesota has a long history of releasing highly regarded 6-row malting barley varieties.  Hear what’s next for this program with two- row and winter barley.
-University of Minnesota - CFANS and MAES Update, Dr. Brian Buhr.  Hear about exciting initiatives and changes at the University from the new Dean of the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) and Director of Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES).

For more information contact MCIA at 800-510-6242 or visit our website at www.mncia.org. For over 100 years MCIA has provided programs and services to meet the needs of an ever changing agricultural world.  These include certification and quality assurance services for seed, forage and mulch, identity preserved grains and sod.  MCIA Organic is a USDA accredited Organic Certification Agency providing local service to a wide variety of producers and processors.  The MCIA foundation seed program works closely with the University of Minnesota plant breeders increasing and marketing new crop varieties.  In addition MCIA provides customized auditing and assessment services for seed and IP grains.  MCIA operates from facilities on the University of Minnesota’s St. Paul campus with field staff located throughout Minnesota.  

 

 

OTTERTAIL POWER OFFERS TIPS FOR THE PUBLIC TO KEEP HOUSEGUESTS SAFE DURING THE HOLIDAYS

Celebrations, family gatherings, and houseguests traditionally increase in number during the winter holiday season. Unfortunately, statistics show that incidents of home fires and accidents typically increase this time of year as well. While festive decorations and savory food may seem like the most important aspects of holiday entertaining, be sure to give careful thought to the safety of your guests.
Otter Tail Power Company offers these tips to help ensure that your home is safe for the holiday season.

Fire safety
-Make sure your stairs, hallways, and entries are properly lighted and keep them free of clutter and other objects that could hinder escape during a fire emergency.
-Use nightlights in hallways and bathrooms.

Decorating safety
-If your Christmas tree is real, be sure to keep it watered. If a bulb gets too hot or there is a short in the wiring, a watered tree is less likely to catch fire.
-Consider LED holiday lights instead of incandescent light strings. LED lights are safer because they are cool to the touch when lit and resist breaking. They also use less electricity so more strings to be connected together, and they can last 50 times longer than incandescent lights.
-Avoid overloading electrical outlets, which can overheat and cause fires. Use no more than three standard-size sets of incandescent lights per single extension cord or outlet.
-Discard decorations with worn or frayed electrical cords, broken or cracked sockets, damaged plugs, or loose connections.
-Make sure extension cords are in good repair and are properly sized for the electrical load. Extension cords used with outdoor decorations must be rated for outdoor use.
-To reduce the chance of electrical shock, use a fiberglass ladder when putting up and taking down holiday lights, and be sure to stay clear of overhead electrical wires.
-Fasten outdoor lights securely to protect them from wind damage. Never yank, kink, or bend electrical cords or hang them from nails. Don’t nail or staple through electrical cords. Cracking the insulation around the wiring could lead to shock or electrical fire.
-Use only weatherproof electrical devices outdoors. And protect them from moisture, especially at connections to extension cords or to additional light strings or other electrical decorations.
-Make sure electrical decorations bear labels indicating that they have been tested by independent agencies, such as Underwriters Laboratories. A green UL label rates them for indoor use only. A red UL label indicates that they are suitable for outdoor and indoor use.
-Turn off and unplug all electrical decorations before leaving home or going to sleep.

Keep young visitors in mind
-Install tamper-resistant receptacles to prevent electrical shocks and burns, or use safety covers on all unused outlets that are accessible to children.
-Never allow children to play with electrical decorations or cords.

“It’s important to keep safety in mind while preparing for this exciting and extremely busy time of year,” says Otter Tail Power Company Safety Services Manager Eric Hamm. “We remind everyone to exercise good judgment. A proactive approach to safety will help you give the gift of safety to your family and friends this holiday season.”

 

 

 

THURSDAY - NOVEMBER 20,  2014

UMC TO HOST RENEE RONGEN ON DECEMBER 1

Be the Entrepreneur of Your Life” is the presentation topic of popular speaker and author Renee Rongen on Monday, December 1, at the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC). Rongen’s presentation begins at 6:00 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. All are welcome and admission is free.
With messages transcending the barriers of age, gender, and occupation, Rongen’s entertaining, engaging and energetic style, coupled with customized rich content moves audiences to act, live, and work differently.  
Rongen’s presentation is sponsored by the Business Department and Communication program at UMC along with Concerts and Lectures and the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES). For more information, contact Megan Pederson at 218-281-8573.

Background on Reneé Rongen
Rongen is an award winning humorous and inspirational speaker, author, and business consultant.  She engages her audience with her “legacy living” philosophy.  Her comedic timing coupled with Rongen’s acclaimed gift as master story teller make her the perfect fit for organizations who want to inspire and grow their culture to be the best in the industry. 
In addition to her speaking, she is an accomplished author of several popular books. Her newest work titled Fundamentally Female, released in October 2012, was included in the Oscar and Golden Globe swag bags for all female nominees. A second book in the Fundamentally Female series entitled I’m a Girl…That’s Why is set for release in 2015.


 

MNDOT ENCOURAGES RESIDENTS TO GET THEIR MAILBOXES READY FOR THE SEASON

With winter weather here, the Minnesota Department of Transportation encourages residents to get their mailboxes ready for the season. During winter, residents are responsible for the care and replacement of a damaged mailbox unless it was directly hit by a snowplow. Minnesota Statute 169.072 cities that mailboxes along state highways need to conform to location and breakaway standards. These standards are available at the following web page: http://www.dot.state.mn.us/stateaid/trafficsafety/safety/mailboxes.pdf

Often when damage occurs, it is the result of mailboxes not conforming to these requirements. This is often caused by rusting mailboxes or posts that do not stand up to the snow thrown by plows. Please note the following reminders about mailboxes along state highways:
-Mailbox reflectors and driveway markers should be blue or clear. Motorists may confuse red and orange reflectors with vehicle tail lights, which could draw them toward the mailbox when visibility is limited.
-Mailboxes with damaged or worn latches should be replaced. Wind and heavy snow can cause a mailbox door to fall open if the latch isn’t working properly.
-Newspaper holders, chains and other types of ornamental displays under the mailbox add to its size and weight and do not leave much room for plow clearance.

MnDOT follows up on all mailbox damage complaints and appreciates cooperation from mailbox owners when investigating damages. Mailbox damage found to be caused by a direct snowplow collision will be repaired by MnDOT. Repairs may take time due to snow removal and other regular maintenance activities.

 

 

WEDNESDAY - NOVEMBER 19, 2014

VILLA ST. VINCENT RECEIVES $100,000 GIFT FROM JUNE SHAVER’S ESTATE

Today was a big day for the Villa St. Vincent in Crookston after they received a $100,000 donation from the estate of June Shaver who recently passed away.   Annette Hegg of Crookston is the executor of the will of June Shaver and presented the Villa St. Vincent Foundation with the check.  “June was a very caring person, always thought of the patients first when I worked with her at the clinic for 30 some years," said Hegg. "She never put patients second, she had a love for older people and was very community minded. Education was a priority for young people and she wanted them to go to college, preferable UMC. When she gave the donation I tried to get her do it publicly but she wanted nothing to do with that so this is the way she wanted it done.”   Hegg presented the check to Lori Wagner, Villa St. Vincent Foundation Director; Jackie Brekken, foundation chair; Allan Dragseth, chair of the major gift committee; and Allen Pedersen (Major gift committee member and legacy member.  “ June Shaver was a resident at our assisted living and she learned to love it," said Lori Wagner. "At first it was hard, but she loved the other residents and wanted to leave an impact and legacy as she has done everywhere else in the community. We asked for a gift to finish the entry and drive up, so she gave us the $100,000 IRA upon her death. We miss her very much.”
The new heated entrance and drive through at the Villa St. Vincent will be finished with Shaver’s gift of $100,000.


 Lori Wagner, Jackie Brekken, Annette Hegg, Allan Dragseth, Allen Pedersen

 





POLK COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS MET TUESDAY IN CROOKSTON

The Polk County Commissioners met on Tuesday and held a public hearing on the Union Lake Sarah Improvement District’s proposed amendment to include user fees, special assessments or ad valorem tax, which is tax based on the value of real estate or personal property and usually is imposed at the time of a transaction. The improvement district is proposing that 17 percent of the budget should be charged to campground and resort owners based on the number of camper pads. The biggest campground on the lake belongs to Jack Bailey and he told the commissioners he objects to the new fees, but understands the need for the money to help with lake projects.  The commissioners approved the changes. 

Commissioner Warren Strandell, who is also chairman of the Tri-County Community Corrections Center said there are some changes coming due to the resignation of director Phil Greer. “With Phil Greer taking a new job at the end of the year the task is to find a new executive director so the board has a big decision to make," said Strandell. "I would think we would use a firm like Springsted Consulting who helped us find a replacement for Greer,  so a decision will be made soon.”
The corrections center continues to have a lot of inmates with 195 prisoners one day in October.  They have a license for 200. "That is the highest we can go," said Strandell. "Of that group 91 were paying customers bringing $145,290.00 in which helps the operations budget.”

The commissioners signed an agreement with the Minnesota Department of  Employment and Economic Security for employment and training services through a grant of $547,484.00.

Michelle Cote, Director of Property Records said three more PILT (Payments in lieu of taxes) payments were received from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife for 2011amounting to $29,552.00, along with two from the Northwest Multi County Housing HUD units for 2013-2014 for $10,398.42 and for non HUD unites for 2013-2014 for $3,963.46 for total of $43,913.88.

Kent Johnson, Polk County Social Services director had three resignations to report. Case aid Heather Parrish,  Julie Schaff and Kimberly Larson with eligibility. The board approved to hire replacements.  Celeste Morris submitted a retirement letter as Clerk Typist Cashier IV in the finance department.  They will advertise for a replacement. They have a maintenance position open and the commissioners will advertise for two-half time positions.

The Polk County Commissioners awarded a septic loan to Roger and Geraldine Dahl  for a  system fix up at a cost of $6,697.80 to be repaid over the next 10 years.

The commissioners were given information on a social host ordinance being proposed by Polk County Public Health in the county and cities. The City of Crookston already has a social host ordinance.  “We just want to remind the commissioners that Crookston enacted an ordinance in 2009 and we plan to go into East Grand Forks as they have their own police department.  Both the police chief and Sheriff Barb Erdman are in favor of the ordinance and getting it in other communities," said Sue Thompson of Polk County Public Health. "The ordinance actually holds the individual who provides the environment for underage drinking to occur regardless as to who provided the alcohol. An example is if I allowed my son’s friends over to drink even if I did not provide the alcohol, I would civilly or criminally  be libel under the social host ordinance.”
The social host ordinance has 102 cities on board and  23 counties in Minnesota and several states in the country.

 



COMMISSIONER ELECT ATTENDS THE POLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD MEETING

Joan Lee, of McIntosh, who was recently elected to serve as a Polk County Commissioner for District 4 was at the Commissioners board meeting this week to gather information and start the learning process on being a board member.  “I’m very excited and very honored to have this opportunity to serve on the board,  I’m burning a trail for women also,” said Lee. “I was born and raised on a dairy farm at Princeton, Minnesota. My husband Mark and I were married in 1986 and we moved to McIntosh to take over his parent’s farm in 1989. It was a dairy farm so in 2006 we transitioned it to organic and this fall we sold the dairy herd, so we have young stock and cropland. This job will fit in as I will have the time to do the work.”
Lee’s family includes three grown children. “They were raised on the farm, Rebecca graduated from the University of Minnesota and is an inventory analyst at the corporate office of Gander Mountain in St. Paul, son Joseph also graduated from U of M and is a mechanical engineer for Polaris at their office in Wyoming, Minnesota and recently was in Poland helping set up a new plant," said Lee. "Samantha is a student of U of M Carlson school, majoring in marketing and will intern with Polaris this summer in Edina."
Lee will be sworn in at the meeting in January replacing Warren Affeldt who has retired.

 


CROOKSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ISLAND PARTY COMING THIS WEEKEND

Friday night, November 21 is the Crookston Chamber of Commerce Celebration Island community dinner and auction at the Crookston Inn.  Sandy Kegler from the Crookston Chamber said the celebration has many baskets for the silent auction.  “The baskets include donated items from business and chamber members like the birthday bash, swimming parties, balloons from Crookston Floral, days at the beach, vouchers from travel agencies," said Kegler. "There is a pet basket, wake up and smell the coffee basket and the big special is a UMC basket.”  
Beer and wine tasting starts it off at 6:00 PM in the new remodeled banquet room at the Crookston Inn. "This is the one fundraiser of the year for the chamber," said Kegler. "Dinner starts at 6:45 with the silent auction going on, there will be games, a live DJ and dancing through the night and the high school dance line will perform."  Tickets are available at the Crookston Chamber office, Willow and Ivy, Four Seasons Clothing and Rejuv Salon and Spa at a cost of $35.



 

CROOKSTON AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY REMINDS THE PUBLIC THAT THIS WEEK IS AMERICAN EDUCATION WEEK

The Theme of American Education Week this year is “Great Public Schools: A Basic Right and Our Responsibility.” Our schools represent a major investment in our community. Teachers, school administration and support staff are one of the most important parts of our community’s leadership and represent the best possible avenue of improving the quality of life in our Country. They can’t do it alone. This year’s theme should remind each of us that all of us have a duty and a responsibility to see that our children are prepared to take up the roles of citizens and leaders in the years to come.
The American Legion, The National Education Association and the Office of Education first observed American Education Week during December 4 -10, 1921. The Congress of Parents and Teachers (PTA) and the National School Board Association joined as co-sponsors in 1938. It is with great pride that the Crookston American Legion Nels T Wold Post 20, Sons of the American Legion and Auxiliary offer our support and gratitude to all employees of School District 593, Cathedral Grade School and Our Savior’s Lutheran School.

Crookston American Legion Auxiliary
Nels T Wold Unit 20




CROOKSTON EAGLES ANNOUNCE WINNERS FROM THE AUXILIARY RAFFLE


The Crookston Eagles Auxiliary announced the winners of their raffle drawings that were held on Sunday, November 16.
$500.00 Gift Certificate from Bergan's Travel - LaVonne Merten
$431 Sportsman's Lodge Ice Fishing for two in Baudette - Phil Olson
Rejuv Salon and Spa gift certificate for $65 -  Boone. 
2- $25.00  B and E Meats gift certificates - John Haggerty and Mike Melbye
$25 Ampride Gas Card - Mary Jo Jobe
$25  Holiday Gas Card - Ellen Beggs
$25 handcrafted throw - Jack Bone
$20 Monday Burger Basket  for 4 - Sam Melbye
$10 Eagle’s Drink card - Roger Odeggard.



 

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN CHURCH FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE HOSTING A BUS TRIP TO THE CONCORDIA CHRISTMAS CONCERT

St. Paul’s Fellowship Committee has purchased 25 tickets and is hosting a bus trip to attend the annual Concordia Christmas Concert on Saturday, December 6 at 2:00 p.m. We will be leaving from the church parking lot at noon for the concert, followed by a stop at the Frying Pan in Moorhead for dinner on the way home. The bus ride is FREE and tickets for the concert can be purchased at the group rate of $11. Please make your check out to ST. PAUL’S FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE. They are collecting for the ticket(s) when you sign up at the church office. Tickets will be handed out as we board the bus. If you have any questions call Deb Magsam at 281-5429.

 

 

TUESDAY - NOVEMBER 18,  2014

CROOKSTON PARK AND REC GIVES FINANCIAL REPORT ON SUMMER ACTIVITIES, AND STARTS A WINTER ESCAPE PACKAGE

The Crookston Park Board met on Monday and had a report from Supervisor Scott Butt on the finances of the summer programs.   
The baseball program had 78 participants and cost $13,795.00 and after expenses the program made $107. 
The girls softball program had 65 participants at a cost of $7,150 and after expenses they had a gain of $180.  
The Club Kid program had 57 participants at a cost over $12,000 which led to a $4,000 loss in the program. 
The Park Board will look at changes and meet with the school personnel on their programs so there is no duplication. 
Park and Recreation Director Scott Riopoelle said the Curling program is growing with another open house planned for Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. at the Crookston Sports Center. “The open house will have a learn to curl clinic with Andrew Johnson,” said Riopelle.  “The clinic last week was well attended so this is another opportunity for those interested, curling will start in early December and go through March for the evening league and the afternoon session will go to early March which is growing, we hope to have 16 teams in both leagues.”

A colorful map of all the parks in the city has been completed and is available. “UMC students and the Early Childhood group put together a map of the parks in town and all the unique things to do in the park for the different ages, people can check the map out and know what age children are right for which park,  it will be on line and available for handout,” said Riopelle.

A new program called Winter Escape is being planned for residents to get out and enjoy activities at the Crookston Sport Center.  Riopelle said, “We are trying something new this year during the cold winter with a program Winter Escape at the Crookston Sports Center where people can use the fitness area, skate on the rink, walk the track and go to the golf simulator for a half hour between 9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. for four months from December through March for $100," said Riopelle.  "It should get people out of the house and get active with others.” Anyone interested should stop at city hall to get more information and sign up.

 

 

CITY OF CROOKSTON GETTING A NEW PHONE SYSTEM TO TIE DEPARTMENTS TOGETHER AND SAVE MONEY

The City of Crookston will have a new phone system tying all the departments together. “The prior phone systems throughout the city were installed in 2000 so they are fairly old and none of them are interconnected,” said Phillip Barton, City of Crookston Technology Director. “This is a very large project to get everyone on one phone system. So far we have city hall on the system, we will bring the fire and police departments on one by one, so when people call they are calling the city and will get routed to the person they need. It will take a considerable amount of time as it changes the way the calls are terminated as we are moving from a digital system that is separate from the computer system to one that will operate on top of the computer system so it is a rather large project.”
The project will not be completed until next summer and will lower the phone bill for the city.

 

 

 

RIVERVIEW HEALTH TO HOST THE NOVEMBER HEALTH LUNCHEON ON NOVEMBER 25

Medicine has come a long way. If you need proof, look no further than the Shingles vaccination, Zostavax. In a clinical trial involving thousands of adults 60 years old and older, Zostavax reduced the risk of Shingles by more than half.
If you do not know what Shingles is, count yourself lucky. Shingles is an acute, painful inflammation of the nerve ganglia, with a skin eruption often forming a girdle around the middle of the body. It is caused by the same virus as chickenpox. After you have chickenpox, the virus that caused it, called varicella, remains in your body. It's always inside you, lying dormant (or asleep) in your nerve cells. At some point later in life, your immune system may weaken, allowing the virus to resurface as Shingles. You may be feeling great, but if you've had chickenpox, the Shingles virus is already inside you. And your risk for Shingles increases as you get older.
RiverView Pharmacy Director Kristen Chisholm, PharmD, will explain the symptoms and treatment of Shingles at RiverView’s November 25 Health Luncheon, “Shingles Vaccination: What you need to Know.’’
The shingles vaccine is not recommended to treat active shingles or post-herpetic neuralgia (pain after the rash is gone) once it develops; so the time to arm yourself with knowledge about keeping the painful skin rash at bay is now.
The luncheon will be held in Meeting Room #1 beginning at noon. Meeting Room #1 is located near the RiverView Clinic entrance on the north side of the hospital and across from the elevators on first floor.
The luncheon series is in its sixteenth year of sponsorship by RiverView Health. All men and women interested in improving their health are invited to attend. Each luncheon starts a few minutes past noon and luncheons are kept under one hour so those needing to return to work can attend. The presentations are free and attendees can bring their own lunches or purchase a bag lunch for $3.00. Pre-registration is required. Call Holly Anderson at 218-281-9745 to reserve a seat.



 

UMC CHOIR AND JAZZ BAND, ALONG WITH CROOKSTON COMMUNITY BAND TO PERFORM ON SUNDAY

Enjoy the beautiful sounds of talented student, faculty, staff, and community musicians during the fall music concert at the University of Minnesota Crookston. The concert featuring the UMC Jazz Band, the UMC Choir, and the Crookston Community Band, will take place on Sunday, November 23, at 2:00 p.m. in the Kiehle Auditorium. There is no admission charge, but a freewill offering will be taken to support music programs on the Crookston campus.
The Crookston Community Band and UMC Jazz Band are under the direction of TJ Chapman, a lecturer at UMC, and the UMC Choir is directed by Associate Professor George French.

 

 

HALLOCK GETS $200,000 AND EAST GRAND FORKS GETS $150,000 TO UPGRADE ICE ARENA'S

The communities of Hallock and East Grand Forks will be receiving grant money to upgrade their ice rink facilities.  The money comes from the Mighty Ducks Grants and are administered by the Minnesota Amateur Sports Commission.  According to the Commission there are two issues driving the upgrades happening across the state, including air quality issues associated with zambonis, and the use of Freon, or R-22 – an ingredient used to make ice that will no longer be imported by the U.S. Government beginning in the year 2020.  “Hockey and other ice sports are a way of life in Northern Minnesota, but these costly and necessary upgrades would be out of reach for small towns and school districts like Hallock if this grant money wasn’t available.  The city will receive $200,000 in Mighty Ducks grant money and we are all so grateful,” said Sen. LeRoy Stumpf (DFL-Plummer). 
According to the Commission, in addition to Hallock’s $200,000 grant the City of East Grand Forks was awarded $150,000 for ice rink upgrades.  About half of the state’s 240 ice arenas are affected by the ban of R-22, and many are considering the costly upgrades which can push $2 million in some areas.  The upgrades mean a complete overhaul to a more environmentally friendly system that uses ammonia or other chemicals as the refrigerant. 
In the 2014 Bonding Bill the state legislature provided $1.5 million to the Minnesota Amateur Sports Commission for the Mighty Ducks Grant program.  The Commission appropriated this money to 11 different ice facilities across the state.  Sen. Stumpf is chair of the Senate Capital Investment Committee which puts together the Bonding Bill. 

 

 

 

FISHER SCHOOL ANNOUNCES THE OCTOBER STUDENTS OF THE MONTH

The Fisher School recently announced their October Students of the month.  They are Ryan Nalipinski, son of Tony and Tracy Nalipinski; Abbie Altepeter, daughter of Joe and Deb Altepeter; Xena Giauque, daughter of Rick Kromschroeder and Chrysti Sanders.


The October students of the month Ryan Nalipinski, Abbie Altepeter, Xena Giauque

 

 

MONDAY - NOVEMBER 17, 2014

ARDELL KNUDSVIG RECEIVES FIRST EVER CONCORDIA COLLEGE ALUMNI CALLED TO FAITHFULLY SERVE AWARD

The National Alumni board of Concordia College in Moorhead has created an award for alumni, "Called to Faithfully Serve" in keeping with the mission of the alumni, which is sending Christians into the world to serve their community.  Crookston's Ardell Knudsvig, a 1960 graduate of Concordia College, was named the first recipient of this award, which was presented to him on Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church.  Knudsvig is a retired science teacher and coach, who was also active in the Crookston High School F.C.A.

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION OFFERS EDUCATION SEMINARS ON THE NEW FARM BILL

With the new farm bill, all farmers that participate in federal farm programs will need to decide which option best fits their farm. The first meetings were geared to dairy producers, now it’s time to focus on the crop production programs. Following is a press release with further details.
In December, University of Minnesota Extension and the Farm Service Agency will begin a series of 73 free education seminars to help crop producers understand decisions necessitated by the 2014 Farm Bill.
Crop producers have until March 31, 2015 to make decisions required by the farm bill, including the choice among three new risk management programs. They will be locked into a decision that lasts five years.
The seminars are offered in 72 counties and will be led by Extension educators and FSA; no registration is required. Details are available in county extension offices or by going to http://z.umn.edu/qjv. The farm bill repeals several previous programs, including direct payments for most crops. It covers the following crops grown in Minnesota: corn, soybeans, wheat, barley, canola, sunflowers, oats, sorghum, lentils, dry peas, garbanzo beans and flax.  “The new farm program is significantly different from the previous one and offers producers the choice of approaches to managing risk,” said Kevin Klair, University of Minnesota Extension economist and program leader at the University’s Center for Farm Financial Management. “This farm program is complex and making selections from the options will be challenging.  We encourage producers to attend an educational meeting, where we’ll cover national decision aid tools to run scenarios for their farm.”
Producers and landowners will need to work closely on program decisions, Klair added. For instance, yield updates and base acre reallocations are landowner decisions, he noted, while other program decisions are made by the farm operator. 
The farm bill designates the extension arm of land-grant universities nationwide as the education provider for producers. More farm bill information is available going to http://z.umn.edu/qpn. For more information, contact me at 800-450-2465 or stordahl@umn.edu.  Sources: Allison Sandve, UM Extension Communications
.

 

 

OKLEE MAN APPEARS IN RED LAKE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT ON BURGLARY CHARGES

Robert Duncan Fox, age 21 of Oklee, plead guilty to two counts of 1st Degree Burglary in District Court in Red Lake Falls on November 3.  Fox was originally charged with four counts of 1st Degree Burglary, two counts of Misdemeanor Tampering with a Motor Vehicle and two counts of Misdemeanor Theft.  Per the plea agreement, several of these charges were dismissed. Mr. Fox is currently free on conditions set by the court and he will make his next court appearance on December 8, 2014 to be formally sentenced for these convictions.  The plea agreement states that he will be sentenced to 21 months of incarceration and all but 90 days of that sentence will be stayed.  He will be placed on supervised probation and undergo a chemical dependency evaluation.  He must abide by the terms of his probation, follow the recommendations of the chemical assessment and pay restitution to all of the affected crime victims or the time stayed will be vacated.  These convictions result from a series of break-ins at various residences in the city of Red Lake Falls during the summer of 2013.  These crimes were investigated by the Red Lake County Sheriff's Office.

 

 

KROX IS LOOKING FOR YOUR DEER HUNTING PICTURES

Did you or somebody you know shoot a buck this past weekend?  If they did email it to chrisjfee@yahoo.com or text them to 218-280-1516 and we will get it on our website.  We had a lot of pictures submitted last year and will do it again this year.


Zach Sanders, son of Laurie and Steve Sanders, not to be outdone by his sister Sophie, shot an 8 point buck this past weekend! Sophie (who shot a deer earlier- see picture by clicking on the link below) did however remind her brother that even though they both shot eight pointers, she did shoot a buck FIRST! 

   
 Chris Huffman with his eight point buck            Seth Goehring with a 10 point buck                  

FOR MORE HUNTING PICTURES CLICK HERE

 

 

NW MINNESOTA FOUNDATION AND CRES TO HOLD AN ENTREPRENEURS' LUNCHEON

Are you interested in turning your idea into a great business? The IDEA Competition provides training, business coaching, and capital to participating entrepreneurs who want to turn an idea into a business. The Northwest Minnesota Foundation, along with the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) at the University of Minnesota Crookston, are sponsoring an Entrepreneurs’ Luncheon on Monday, November 24, 2014, in the back room at RBJ’s Restaurant, 1601 University Ave, Crookston, Minn. The luncheon is an opportunity to network, learn more about the IDEA Competition, and the services provided by the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and CRES.
The lunch is free for all attending. For more information about the sessions, contact Rachel Lundbohm, director, CRES, at 218-281-8595 or e-mail cres@tc.umn.edu.

Background
IDEA was launched through the efforts of several partners who pooled their experience, services, and knowledge to frame a program that would be effective for helping these new stars of our future. Funding for the program has been provided by the Blandin Foundation and the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, together with contributions from several other partners: 360º Manufacturing and Applied Engineering Center of Excellence, Arvig, Bemidji State University, Bremer Banks of Crookston and Warren, Headwaters Regional Development Commission,  Midwest Minnesota Community Development Corporation, Northwest Regional Development Commission, University of Minnesota, Crookston, and the Northwest Regional Small Business Development Center. To learn more, visit ideacompetition.org.
The Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies assists entrepreneurs in Northwestern Minnesota with the development and creation of their entrepreneurial enterprise. The services offered are based on the client's needs. The mission of CRES is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting. It engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota. For more information on CRES, visit umccres.org.

 

 

UMC HUNT SEAT EQUESTRIAN TEAM LEADS THE REGIONAL TEAM STANDINGS

The University of Minnesota Crookston hunt seat equestrian team is currently at the top of the regional team standings with 197 points. They currently lead the University of Minnesota by 10 points, while North Dakota State University is third with 180.
In addition, UMC’s Emily Steeley (Jr., Portsmouth, R.I.) leads the Cacchione Cup standings. Named for Mario “Marty” Cacchione, whose son Bob founded the IHSA in 1967 and still runs the organization to this day, the Cacchione Cup is presented every season at IHSA Nationals to the top hunter seat open rider. Every open rider who finishes the regular season with the most combined flat and fences points within their region advances directly to IHSA Nationals to compete for the cup.
Sable Bettencourt (Jr., Cloquet) is tied for fourth in the Cacchione Cup standings.
UMC already has had Margaret Knowles (Sr., Bloomington) qualify for regionals in Walk Trot. Sam Kramer (Sr., Corcoran) and Anna Ojczyk (Fr., White Bear Lake) have qualified in Novice Equitation on the Flat. Bettencourt has qualified for Intermediate Equitation on the Flat and Intermediate Equitation Over Fences. 

 

 

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE, JIM SELE, TO SING WITH A GROUP ON THE PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION SHOW


Jim Sele, a Crookston High School graduate, sings with the Choral Arts Ensemble in Rochester, MN.  This weekend the group will be featured on the Prairie Home Companion show with Garrison Keillor (The set of the show is pictured above).

 

 

 

FRIDAY - NOVEMBER 14,  2014

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TRI-COUNTY COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS RESIGNS TO MOVE TO DIFFERENT JOB

Phillip Greer, Executive Director at Tri County Corrections in Crookston has submitted his resignation to the Regional Corrections Board to accept another job in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Greer has been at Tri County for three years and told the board he expected to stay until retirement. Greer has accepted the position of Chief of the Metropolitan Detention Center in Albuquerque, which is the largest jail in New Mexico with over 2,300 inmates, 600 employees and a $90 million dollar budget. Greer said it was an opportunity he could not pass up. Greer will be leaving at the end of the year.
 

DEPARTURE OF GREER LEAVES SCHOOL BOARD VACANCY

The Crookston School Board will have another vacancy at the end of the year as Phillip Greer is leaving his job at Corrections to take a job in New Mexico.  School Board Chairman Frank Fee is asking district residents interested in serving to apply now.  “We are disappointed to see Phil leave with what he has already brought to the board, but are certainly glad for his opportunity. We will be looking to fill his position right away,” said Fee.  “For the next two weeks starting on Monday until the end of the month we are taking applications from people willing to serve out what is a two year term. Then the first week in December the board will gather and make a decision who will serve starting the first of January, which will give them time to attend the school board convention and hit the ground running,”
Interested candidates have to be living in the Crookston School District and send or drop off their interest to the school district office which is located at the high school. No resume is required, just the person's interest. For more information the interested party can contact Chris Bates, the Crookston School Superintendent
chrisbates@isd593.org or the school board chair, Frank Fee at ffee@rrv.net.


 

 

UMC THEATER DEPARTMENT TO PERFORM THE PLAY "NEXT TO NORMAL" NOVEMBER 19-22

The cast has been rehearsing since September, and for Senior Alissa Hernandez, that has meant juggling rehearsal schedules as the director while learning the lyrics and lines as one of the characters in the fall theater production of “Next to Normal” at the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC).   
Described as a contemporary musical, “Next to Normal” runs Wednesday, November 19-21 at 7:00 p.m. and Saturday, November 22 at 2:00 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. A live orchestra supports the performance, which showcases the vocal talent of the six-member cast. Admission is $8 for adults and all students are $5 with the exception of UMC students who are free with their U-card. The production is recommended for audiences in high school and older and not suitable for young children.
A focused student, Hernandez is a double major in equine science and animal science with a minor in ag business from Savage.  Musical performance has been a part of her life since she was in elementary school and a member of the sixth grade honor choir. Her love for acting grew as she took to the stage in junior high, and over the years, Hernandez has been involved in some 25-plus musical or theatrical productions since junior high—five of them alone as a student at UMC. “I am finding it challenging to direct and act,” Hernandez smiles. “When you are the director, you can sit and watch and see what your cast needs, but while you are on stage, you are focused on performing and it has been both interesting and fun to combine the two roles as actor and director.”
Hernandez and cast mate, Alex Conwell, are seasoned performers, but for a number of the others, “Next to Normal” is a first time experience in a musical, as part of a cast at the Crookston campus, or the first time ever on stage. Cassie Hagg, a sophomore majoring in health sciences from Pillager, joins Hernandez as the assistant director and together under the guidance of Associate Professor George French the musical is taking shape. 
Other members of the “Next to Normal” cast are Michael Laurich, a senior majoring in biology from Lansing, Ill.; Jiwon “Peter” Park, a junior majoring in accounting from Changwon, South Korea; David Melichar, a freshman majoring in elementary education from Richfield; Alex Conwell, a post-secondary enrollment student from Red Lake Falls; Erin Rudstrom, a postsecondary enrollment student from East Grand Forks.
The production—serious, yet at times, humorous—has minimal props and focuses the audience on life in the Goodman family. "Next to Normal" tells the story of a mother, played by Hernandez, struggling with bipolar disorder and its effect on her family. Addressing such issues as grieving a loss, ethics in modern psychiatry, and suburban life, “Next To Normal” takes audiences into the minds and hearts of each character as they cope with crisis and mental illness.
“This performance is different from anything we have done on campus before,” Hernandez says. “It is a story that everyone can relate to and in many ways, the family we portray has something in common with every family.”
French who leads the music and theater department on the Crookston campus describes the music as “sophisticated rock” and believes audiences will enjoy it.
Hernandez encourages audiences to see “Next to Normal” because as she explains, “it is real and raw with a fast pace that hits home.” To learn more about “Next to Normal, visit www.nexttonormal.com.


Back row - Michael Laurich, Alex Conwell, Cassie Hagg, and Alissa Hernandez.
Front row - Jiwon “Peter” Park, Erin Rudstrom, and David Melichar

 

 

VILLA ST. VINCENT AUXILIARY TO HOLD THE ANNUAL LIGHT UP LIFE TREE FUNDRAISER

The Villa St. Vincent Auxiliary is holding the annual Light Up a Life fundraiser with ceremony on December 10.  Light up a life is a fundraiser with 100% of your donations going toward the Villa St. Vincent Auxiliary projects. For a $5.00 donation they will light up a bulb on the Light up a Life Tree. You may make a donation in Memory of or in Honor of a family member, friend or loved one. The lighting ceremony will be December 10 at 5:00 p.m. at the gazebo in Walsh Park, in front of the Villa St. Vincent. There will be caroling outside and then they will move inside and go caroling through the halls for the Villa residents and finish the evening with hot chocolate and cookies. Everyone is invited to attend. If you have any questions, contact Tamara Parkin, Enrichment Coordinator Villa St. Vincent, at 281-9723 or email tamara.parkin@bhshealth.org.

 

 

 

CROOKSTON FIRE DEPARTMENT AND FAMILIES HELP NORTH COUNTRY FOOD BANK


M
embers of the Crookston Fire Department along with their families volunteered their time at the North Country Food Bank on Wednesday evening.  They filled 2,008 backpack bags in less than two hours.

 

 

 

THURSDAY - NOVEMBER 13,  2014

FORMER POLK COUNTY AUDITOR/TREASURER, JERRY AMIOT IS THE EXPERIENCED AMERICAN OF THE MONTH

Jerry Amiot of Crookston is the Experienced American of the month for November and will be honored with a reception on Friday, November 14 from 1:00 to 3:00 PM at the Golden Link Senior Citizens Center with a program at 2:00 PM..   Jerry Amiot has a long history of working for Polk County.  “I started with the county in 1967 at the highway department for Bernie Lieder," said Amiot. "His assistant Don Nolting asked me to go to J.C. Penny and I agreed to it. Two years later Martin Vanseth, the Polk County Auditor, asked me to come to work for him and that started the many years which I enjoyed as deputy auditor and then took over as the Polk County Auditor when Larry Fontaine passed away in July, 1986. As county auditor, I ran for election four times and later appointed in 1993 as Polk County Auditor/Treasurer."  Amiot worked for Polk County for 44 years and retired in July of 2011. "It was time to move on to other things," said Amiot.
Amiot spends many volunteer hours with the Polk County Historical Society,  “It is a real passion for me and when I retired I said I would get more active in the Historical Society, Crookston Lions and AFRAN," said Amiot. "After four months I became president of the Historical Society which is very enjoyable and fills my time. I still have a place in Canada where I go from May to September and still remain active with the clubs where I have been president of the Lions and now work as zone chair of five clubs in the Lions. No boring moments and I enjoy everything,” said Amiot.
Everyone is welcome at the reception on Friday afternoon from 1:00 to 3:00 at the Golden Link.



 

UMC INTERNATIONAL WEEK TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 16-21

A week of events is slated at the University of Minnesota Crookston during International Week, Sunday, November 16 through Friday, November 21. From culinary creations to an international market, International Week will include adventures from around the world. A complete list of events is available at www.umcrookston.edu/today.
International Week highlights include:

Sunday, November 16
from 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. the Study Abroad Club will host a pancake, sausage, and egg fundraiser at the American Legion in Crookston. Also, there will be a variety of treats for sale.  The Study Abroad Club students will be selling tickets for $5.50 (advance) and $6.50 at the door. Student tickets are $4.50 (advance) and $5.50 at the door.

Monday, November 17, in Brown Dining Room enjoy international cuisine during a lunch from the four corners of the world. Featured countries are Brazil, Somalia, China, and Sri Lanka. The public is welcome to join the campus for lunch at a cost of 7.65 plus tax per person served from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The featured foods include Brazil’s feijoada with rice; Somalia’s sambusa; China’s eggs and tomato fried rice; and Sri Lanka’s dhal curry with chicken, vegetable curry, and fried potato.

Wednesday, November 19 in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center there will be an International Market. There will be items for sale from 1:00-5:00 p.m. including handcrafts, art, food, and more. Everyone is encouraged to visit the market and shop. There will also be an ice cream social from 3-4 p.m. in the Bede Ballroom. The event is sponsored by the Study Abroad Club and Multicultural and International Club (MIC). These events are all open to the public.

Thursday, November 20, there will be a day of giving in the international lounge. Everyone is encouraged to donate clothes and shoes from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Also, on this day there will be a coffee hour with Kristina Gray. There will be coffee and a discussion at 1:00 p.m. in the International Lounge, Sargeant Student Center, on the book "Two Kyrgyz Women" and human trafficking. At 5:00 p.m. in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center, join Stephanie Reko as she tells her story on going abroad twice. Reko has traveled to England and Ireland. 


       The International Market in 2013 (Picture submitted by UMC)


 

 

 

 

CATHEDRAL SCHOOL HOSTS A VETERAN'S DAY PROGRAM

The Cathedral School 4th Graders led the Veteran's Day program on Wednesday in the Cathedral gymnasium.  The color guard presented the flag followed by songs featuring the 4th grade class and the 4th grade through 6th grade choir.  A flag folding ceremony (pictured above) was performed by the members of the National Guard and the VFW and Legion Posts, along with Bill and Jamie Cassavant.


          Cathedral students with their patriotic head wear during the program

 

 

CROOKSTON EARLY CHILDHOOD INITIATIVE HOLDS FIRST ANNUAL COSTUME 1K AND 5K RUN

The Crookston Early Childhood Initiative recently held its first Annual fund-raising costume 1K and 5K.  The BOO RUN was a great success despite the chilliness of the day.  “On behalf of the Crookston Early Childhood Initiative we would like to thank the following businesses for their donations to our 1st Annual Boo Run Run event:  Arby’s, Taco Johns, Cobblestone Hotel, Rejuv, Walmart, McDonald’s, Draft’s, AmericInn, Cofe’, RBJ’s, B&E Meats, Brandner Printing, Siegle Sports, Montague’s, JJ’s body Shop, Crookston Floral, M&H, Widman’s, and Four Season’s,” said Amanda Bochow, committee member.  “Also many thanks to Dennis Koch from the Crookston Running Club for providing the clock for final running times, the Crookston Police Department for leading the run, and Nicole at Joyful Heart Photography for taking pictures.”


                           The kids get ready to start the 1K run as part of the Early Childhood Initiative Boo Run fundraiser



        The adults get ready to start the run as part of the Boo Run Early Childhood Initiative fundraiser run

 

 

WEDNESDAY -  NOVEMBER 12, 2014

CITY OF CROOKSTON LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY TO FILL OPENING ON CITY COUNCIL'S WARD 3

The Crookston Ways and Means committee put a plan in place to replace council member Gary Willhite in Ward 3 as he will be mayor starting in 2015.  “If you are interested in the Ward 3 council position all we are asking residents to do is send a letter of intent or drop it off at city hall by the end of November,” said Crookston Mayor Dave Genereux. “We will interview the people in December and we will get someone to come on with the others council members at the end of the year, we will ask a lot of questions at the interview.”


 

CROOKSTON'S MAYOR-ELECT SAYS THANK YOU

Letter to Editor,

Thank you to all those whom participated in the City Election on Tuesday, November 4th.  I am humbled, honored and grateful for the opportunity you have given me to serve as your Mayor.  I promise I will do my best to lead Crookston into the future.  As I visited neighborhoods, I had the privilege of meeting several residents of Crookston for the first time and many that I have worked and served with in the past.  I am so impressed with their friendly, positive and supportive attitude towards the City of Crookston’s future.    I am looking forward to working with fellow council members, city employees and you, the citizens of this great community to accomplish our goals.  Working together we can accomplish much!  There will be opportunities to keep citizens informed, involved and even more important listen to your IDEAS.
Mayor Dave Genereux has been involved in City Government for the past 27 years, so much can be learned from Mayor Dave and I plan to spend time in the next two months with him to gain as much wisdom as possible and hopefully, we will have time to share thoughts over the years ahead.  The Community of Crookston is forever grateful for his service.
Congratulations to incumbent council members,  Bob Quanrud and Tom Vedbraaten, newly elected council members Steve Erickson and Dennis Regan, and thank you to Hector Santellanes and Dana Johnson for their service on the council over the past years, and those willing to place their name on the ballot, Dale Stainbrook, Jerry Persson, William Enlow, Adam Herberg and Travis Oliver.
I have learned long ago, we do not accomplish much on our own, and therefore ask your support and willingness to join the leaders in our community to make things even better in Crookston!

May God continue to Bless Crookston!
Gary Willhite

 

 

CROOKSTON EARLY CHILDHOOD SUMMIT HELD AT UMC

The Crookston Early Childhood Summit was held on Tuesday evening at Bede Ballroom on the University of Minnesota Crookston campus for day care providers and teachers of early childhood programs.  Children’s Mental Health was the topic with Kim Hemberger and Angie Gerding from the Northwestern Mental Health Center in Crookston.   Hemberger coordinates the early childhood team at the Mental Health Center and says spending time with youngsters is a key to development.  “Time is a big thing and we never have enough time. Parents don’t have enough time and that can have a parent child relationship not as strong as it could be,” said Hemberger. “Parents who spend more time will get more benefits, they just want love and undivided attention. Shut out the media and technology and spend time with the child, children that are referred will get testing and we help families at home and in the classroom.” Tara Miller, social worker with the Crookston schools is part of the team with Hemberger. Angie Gerding is the Early Childhood Specialist in Autism Spectrum Disorder and says there are many levels of autism.   “Autism can range from kids who struggle with high intensity behaviors and issues and some struggle with social skills,” said Gerding.  “We help parents come to terms with the diagnosis and accessing services in the area is a big thing for parents and we help them navigate that route and help them make their own strategies to help their child.”
Summit participants received tool kits for use in their programs.   An Otto Bremer Foundation grant funded all the events of the Early Childhood Summit.

 

 



 

CATHEDRAL SCHOOL FIRST GRADERS DESIGN A COMMUNITY IN SOCIAL STUDIES CLASS


The Cathedral School 1st Graders opened their Community Unit is Social
Studies by building their own classroom city.  A community is where people live, work, and play, so the 1st graders designed houses, sky scrapers, police, fire and jail buildings, a school, church , an arena, stores and  a water tower.

 

 

CENTER FOR RURAL ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES TO OFFER HELP TO SMALL BUSINESSES

Entrepreneurs and small business owners can receive valuable help through an opportunity offered by the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) at the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC). CRES is seeking regional entrepreneurs and small business owners interested in forming a unique partnership that would include valuable consulting services by UMC students under the guidance of qualified faculty at no cost.
Each semester, both spring and fall, CRES integrates projects into courses offered on campus. These projects become an integral part of the course curriculum and are designed to benefit small business owners and entrepreneurs while providing students with real-world business experiences.
Applications for the program are accepted anytime; however, priority is given to applications received prior to the due dates. The spring semester application deadline is Friday, December 12, 2014. Applicants will be notified about their participation in the program no later than December 19. 
The projects that best fit the mission of CRES and enhance the learner outcomes for the course will be contacted for a follow-up meeting to determine guidelines, client expectations, and to review other relevant information regarding participation.
For more information about the opportunity, contact Rachel Lundbohm, director of CRES at 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu) or visit the CRES Web site at www.umccres.org. The CRES office is located in Dowell Hall 117 on the Crookston campus.

Background
The Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies assists entrepreneurs in Northwestern Minnesota with the development and creation of their entrepreneurial enterprise. The services offered are based on the client's needs.
The mission of CRES is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting. It engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.

 

 


UMC WESTERN EQUESTRIAN TEAM COMPETES AT NDSU

The University of Minnesota Crookston western equestrian team competed at North Dakota State University over the weekend. The weekend was highlighted by the team earning High Point Team Saturday. “The closer we come to the end of the semester, the more I see the team continue to come together,” Assistant Coach Kayla Krueger said. “Each rider continues to grow stronger in their abilities, and I am excited to continue on our streak of success into our upcoming competition at UWRF.”

Saturday’s competition was a successful one for the Golden Eagles. The day started out with Shannon Salm (Sr., Larsen, Wis.) finished second in the Open Reining. Amberly Pesall (Jr., New Brighton) finished first in the Open Horsemanship division. Amanda Guimont (Jr., Nowthen) was second in a very large Advanced class. Danielle Schelonka (So., Randall) finished first in her Novice division. Jenny Tack (So., St. Bonifacius) was third in her Novice class. Margaret Knowles (So., Bloomington) earned first in her Beginner Horsemanship class.

Sunday, the Golden Eagles were also able to put together strong rides. Pesall finished fourth in a competitive Open Reining division. Salm finished second in her Open Horsemanship class. Chloe Nelson (Jr., Little Falls) and Amy Stadtherr (Jr., New Ulm) were both second in each of their Advanced classes. Kaitlin Van Ruler (Fr., Woodstock) finished fourth in her Novice Horsemanship class. Schelonka continued on her roll from the day before and finished second in her Novice class. Katie Warner (Fr., Warba) finished third in her Intermediate division and Knowles finished second in Beginner Horsemanship.

The Golden Eagles will head to University of Wisconsin-River Falls November 15 and 16.

FOR THE OBITUARY PAGE  CLICK HERE

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