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MONDAY - MAY 25,  2015

CROOKSTON SCHOOL BOARD WILL MEET TUESDAY, MAY 26

The Crookston School District School Board will meet on Tuesday, May 26 at 5:00 p.m. in the Crookston High School Choir/Orchestra room.  Meetings are normally held on Monday’s, but the meeting was moved to Tuesday because Monday was Memorial Day. 
Personnel items on the agenda include an employment agreement with Chris Gough for summer band instructor and Spence Frie for summer orchestra instructor.  They will be asked to approve employment with Karen Danielson for Summer Food Service Helper at Washington School.  The board will also be asked to accept a resignation letter from Beth Carlson as one-act play director.
Items on the main agenda are approval of the revision of the summer school board meeting dates on June 29, July 13, August 10 and 24.  Approve renewal of the Minnesota State High School League Membership.  They will also approve summer programs for the Area Learning Center, Northern Lights Academy, Band, Orchestra, and Community Education. 
The board will hear reports from the principals (Eric Bubna, Chris Trostad, and Denice Oliver) and the superintendent. 
Visitors may share comments and/or concerns with the school board before or at the end of the meeting.

 

 

SATURDAY - MAY 23,  2015

REVEREND JOSEPH PALANIVEL JEYAPAUL PLEADS GUILTY TO SEXUALLY ASSAULTING A 16 YEAR OLD

Reverend Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul, 60, a catholic priest pleaded guilty Friday to sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl while serving in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Crookston. The guilty plea comes nearly 10 years after he assaulted the girl at his home in Greenbush.  Jeyapaul pleaded guilty to fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct, a felony, in one of the two cases. The other case, in which he is charged with two counts of first degree criminal sexual conduct, is still pending.
The maximum penalty for fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct is 10 years imprisonment.
In the other case, Jeyapaul faces more serious charges, punishable by up to 30 years imprisonment per charge.  The victim told police Jeyapaul had violently forced her to give him oral sex and fondled her in the rectory of Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenbush when she was 14, according to court documents.
Jeyapaul was an administrator of Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Greenbush, as well as St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Middle River, and St. Edward's Catholic Church in Karlstad, from the fall 2004 to the fall 2005.
Jeyapaul will be sentenced in the first case on June 15.

 

 

LAST WEEK'S FROST CREATES FROST CONCERN FOR SOYBEAN GROWERS

Last week’s frost created concern for soybean producers, especially those with emerged beans. Although most area soybeans were still protected below ground, or still in the bag, some beans had emerged. Following is recent information from Bruce Potter, UM IPM Specialist.
Spring frost damage to soybean is relatively rare in Minnesota, as the last average frost dates usually occur before soybeans are normally planted. However, soybean planting and emergence is well ahead of the 5-year average, leaving the crop more vulnerable to early season frost events. Temperatures dropped into the upper 20s (F) in the west-central and northwestern parts of the state, likely resulting in some degree of frost injury to emerged soybeans in select areas.
Temperatures at or below 28-30° F for several hours are usually needed to kill soybean tissue. However, an air temperature of 28° F does not guarantee that a soybean crop will freeze.
Although emerged corn was likely frost-damaged, corn seedlings are at a lower risk of death from freezing temperatures than are soybeans, because the growing point of corn remains below ground until the fifth leaf stage. Frost damaged corn will likely recover and should begin to regrow within a few days. In soybean however, the growing points are above ground and are exposed after the cotyledons open. Freezing of all growing points is fatal. However, soybean is better able to compensate for partial stand losses than is corn.
Newly emerged soybeans are protected by the nearby warm soil, and small, emerging and cotyledon stage soybeans can be a bit more tolerant to freezing temperatures than older soybean or corn leaves. For example, in a 2001 study at NDSU, the temperature required to kill 1/2 of the seedlings was as low as 24°F. Older soybeans are less freeze tolerant.
Crook stage soybeans will be killed if the crook tissue below the cotyledons is killed. Likewise, frozen tissue below the cotyledons of any older soybean will result in death. However, if the frost only affects the tops of the young soybean, those with one or more intact cotyledons might recover from surviving axillary buds. In more advanced early season soybeans, regrowth may occur from one of the vegetative buds in the leaf axils. If leaf axils haven't been frozen, the frosted soybean should regrow from one of these growing points.
What are the risk factors? Cold air settles into low-lying areas, heavy residue tends to keep rising soil heat at or below the soil surface, and dry soils tend to lose heat more quickly than moist soils; these environments are more likely to produce freeze injured soybeans. Many other factors like cloud cover, wind, soil temperature, soybean stage, previous weather and genetics influence injury from frost. This often leads to very spotty injury across the landscape.
Soybean frost injury appears as water-soaked lesions on the cotyledons, leaves, or hypocotyl that dry and turn brown after several days. Assessing frost damage should be delayed 3 to 5 days after the event to allow the soybean plants to show signs of new growth. Check for firm, healthy stems, cotyledons and growing points. By this time, it should be evident whether the soybeans are recovering or are dead. If a significant proportion of the population is dead, replanting may be justified. For more information on replanting decisions, see: The soybean grower's guide for evaluating crop damage and replant decisions.
Freeze injury is a traumatic physiological event for the plant and can slow development of soybeans for several days. Affected areas of the field with significant stem and cotyledon damage should be replanted if recovery remains slow. Areas with greatly reduced stands can be replanted by spiking in a full seeding rate alongside the old rows, when replanting can be accomplished by late May.
For more information, contact me at 800-450-2465 or stordahl@umn.edu.   Source: Bruce Potter, UM IPM Specialist.

 

 

FRIDAY - MAY 22,  2015

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL SAYS HELLO TO THEIR NEWEST ALUMNI FRIDAY NIGHT WITH GRADUATION CEREMONY

The Class of 2015 has officially graduated from Crookston High School after the graduation ceremony on Friday night at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus.  The student speakers were Danny Davidson and Sydney Boike.  The foreign exchange student, Maria Camila Cortes Bravo also spoke during the ceremony.  The teacher selected to speak was Shelly Thomforde and proud parents and school board members Dave Davidson and Kari Miller handed out diplomas.


  Click above to see the end of the Crookston High School Graduation ceremony


              Jamee Lynn Rasmussen receives her diploma                           Emmanuel Mello receives his diploma                                      Hayley Viken receives her diploma

FOR PICTURES OF ALL THE GRADUATES CLICK HERE

 

 

 

CROOKSTON POLICE RESPONDS TO A REPORT OF A PERSON ON FIRE

On Thursday, May 21 at 1:57 p.m. the Crookston Police Department, Crookston Fire Department and Crookston Area Ambulance responded to a report of a person on fire at 308 South Nelson Street in Crookston. Upon arrival emergency responders found a 60 year old female outside the home severely burned. She was immediately transported by Crookston Area Ambulance to RiverView Health and later airlifted to a burn unit in the Twin Cities metro area. There was very little damage to the home; no other details are being released at this time as this is an open and ongoing investigation.

 

 

MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE IN THE CROOKSTON AREA ON MONDAY

The Crookston Veteran’s Council will have Memorial Day Services starting at 7:30 a.m. on Monday at the American Legion and leaving for Hafslo Church at 8:00 for the service at 8:20. They will move to St. Peter’s Catholic Church Cemetery in Gentilly for the service at 9:00.
A coffee break will be at 9:30 at RBJ’s with the service at Oakdale Cemetery in Crookston at 10:00 with the flag raising at the entrance. Naval Services will be at 11 at the Sampson’s Addition Bridge. At noon the veterans will be at the Sand Hill Lutheran Church in Climax and then return to the Crookston Memorial Walkway at 12:45 followed by a dinner at the Crookston American Legion for the participants.
The Memorial Day Service at Oakdale Cemetery will have music with the Crookston Band Ensemble with Chris Gough directing. Msgr. Roger Grundhaus will give the invocation and benediction. Miss Crookston Madison Crane will perform In Flanders Field and Charles Reynolds will reply to Flanders Fields. Denice Milton of the 9th district American Legion will give the address.
The Veteran’s Council and Auxiliary will decorate the graves. Bill Cassavant will serve as chaplain. The Firing Squad will perform and taps will be played by Christian Halos with Brian Halos as the drummer. The service will conclude with the Star Spangled Banner by the Band Ensemble.

 

 

 CROOKSTON PIRATE MARCHING BAND LOOKING TO GET NEW UNIFORMS IN SCHOOL COLORS!!!

The Crookston High School Marching Band Instructor Chris Gough is looking to change their look with new uniforms, which were unveiled at the Crookston High School Band Concert last week.  Crookston currently has red, black, and white uniforms and they are several decades old and are getting tough to keep up and it is time to update the uniforms, most importantly, in school colors.  “First of all the new uniforms are in school colors, so I really like that.  It would include new uniforms, new hats, new shoes, and we are also looking at doing some new uniforms for the Treasurettes as well,” said Gough. “The reason why we are trying to do new uniforms now is because the old uniforms are deteriorating and are becoming harder to maintain and there are a lot of individual parts that get lost throughout the course of the year and they are also red, white and black.”  The new uniforms should be easy to maintain and care for. “The new uniforms would have two parts and one size fits all.  They would have snap hems that would allow for length, so a student could get a uniform in ninth grade and keep the uniform until they graduate,” said Gough. “Right now we take back the uniform and try to do resizing work over the summer and that will ease that a little bit.”
The cost of a new uniform will be around $350 each.  “We are looking to do some fundraising things with one event planned for marching band camp this summer at the end of July.  We are also looking for donations, any little bit would help,” said Gough. “We are hopefully going to be selling the old uniforms for the cost of a new uniform to give the community members or even Pirate marching band alumni a chance to buy their old uniform and keep it forever.”
To donate to the Pirate Marching Band New Uniform fund, contact Chris Gough at chrisgough@isd593.org or send a check to:  
Crookston Marching Band C/O Chris Gough
Crookston High School

402 Fisher Ave.
Crookston, MN 56716

 
Zach Lutz models the proposed new uniforms for the Pirate Marching Band


 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE CONDUCTING AWARDS PROGRAM AGAIN THIS YEAR

The Chamber of Commerce Beautification Committee will again be conducting the beautification awards program.  The committee will be doing three rounds of judging throughout the summer in four different categories:
-Presentation of a Landscaped Business
-Presentation of a Storefront Business
-Presentation of a Public Institution or Church 
-Special Achievement (recognition of ongoing achievement)

The committee will be out judging in the next few weeks with the first round qualifiers announced the second week of June. Some of the other projects the committee is working on include maintaining the Main Street Courtyard, the spot on the corner of LeBlanc Realty, maintenance of the entrance signs and painting the adopted downtown corner planters.  There are still two planters available for individuals, clubs or businesses to adopt.
The committee is asking for the community's help in the "Adopt a Basket" program, you will see the hanging baskets lining the streets of the city as well as the addition of four more large pots that will be out on the medians.  You are encouraged to please call Sandy or Rose at the Chamber office 281-4320 to help keep this program alive.  Special thanks to the City of Crookston crew for the daily watering of these and to D&D Thomforde's for the planting and supervision of the flowers. 

 

 

 

THURSDAY - MAY 21,  2015

PARKING LOT PROJECT BID AT CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL COMES BACK LOWER THAN EXPECTED

The Crookston School District received good news this week when they opened the bids for the Crookston High School parking lot project. Only one bid was received, but the bid came in at $1.295 million, about $50,000 lower than expected. “It really was good news. Typically we get five or six bidders and we had one and we were hoping for the bids to come back around $1.3 million and they came in $50,000 under and that included all the little extras like a right hand turning lane (from the teachers parking lot), so were really pleased to get a quality bid,” said Crookston School District Superintendent Chris Bates. “Davidson Construction was the low bidder and having a local company get the bid is always a good thing.”
The work should be done this summer. “They will let us know as quickly as they can on when they will start,” said Bates. “We have summer school and they are going to try to give us time to alert people on which parking lot we will be able to use and it should all be done by the time kids come back to school in September.”

 

 

ALLEN PEDERSEN BIRTHDAY RECEPTION TO BE HELD TODAY FROM 3 TO 5 PM AT THE LEGION

Allen Pedersen will be 99 years old on Friday, May 22 and he is being honored with a reception on Thursday at the Crookston American Legion from 3:00 until 5:00 p.m. Pedersen grew up in Valley City where he still has family. “I grew on the farm two and a half miles out of Valley City, went to school and college there, taught for a while and was Superintendent of Schools before World War II,” said Pedersen. “After the war I went to work for J.I Case and came to Crookston in July, 1948 and transferred to South Dakota in 1956 and came back to Crookston in 1971.”

Pedersen worked at Glenmore Alcohol Treatment Center for over 17 years. “It was called Sunnyrest and when Morris Dickel came on the board it became Glenmore and I became active with the Rotary holding all the offices,” said Perdersen. “I was on city council, active in TRIAD and for 26 years I was active with the American Cancer Society serving as state director.”

Allen was married to Freda were married a long time and taught together and gardened together. “Freda graduated from college in 1935 and we met when we taught together,” said Allen. “She went to the West Coast for a while and then we had a home in Valley City and then to Crookston. We would have been married 75 years if she had lived another three months.”

They always gardened and when they made their will they decided to that the sale of their home would be divided 50-50 with UMC and their church each getting half. After Freda passed away Allen decided to sell the home and UMC and their church each got about $50,000. “UMC was trying to figure out how to use the money and Dr. Wood got orders they needed to have a community garden so later Corby Kemmer said we could donate for the garden,” said Pedersen. “We always had a garden and enjoyed sharing with everyone.”
Pedersen now lives at The Summit where he enjoys a full busy life.

 

 

TORI RHODE RECEIVES THE LENERTZ FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

RiverView Foundation is pleased to announce that the fifteenth recipient of the Lenertz Family Healthcare Scholarship is Tori Rhode.
Rhode, who will receive a $750 grant for the 2015-2016 academic year, is a patient access representative in the Diagnostic Imaging Department at RiverView Health. She is working towards her Master’s in Kinesiology at the University of North Dakota.
In recognition of the time and efforts Thomas C. Lenertz provided to the establishment and advancement of RiverView Foundation, its Board of Directors established the Lenertz Family Healthcare Scholarship. As one of RiverView Foundation’s original founders in 1990, Mr. Lenertz, was instrumental in all stages of development of the RiverView Foundation. As Riverview Healthcare Association CEO, he continued to serve the Foundation as an ex-officio member of the Board of Directors until his retirement in December 2000.
The RiverView Foundation sincerely thanks the Lenertz family and other generous donors that designate scholarship funds to help students in our service area achieve a career in healthcare.
For more information on this scholarship, contact Bruun at 218-281-9249, email kbruun@riverviewhealth.org or by going to the Foundation link on RiverView Health’s webpage at www.riverviewhealth.org


                Tom Lenertz and Tori Rhode

 

 

WEDNESDAY - MAY 20,  2015

CHEDA DISCUSSES TOWNHOME PROJECT AND GIVES ANOTHER REHAB LOAN

The Crookston Housing and Economic Development Authority board met on Tuesday and the discussion centered around housing projects. Executive director Craig Hoiseth said the rehab loan program was getting requests and the Agassiz Townhome project is moving forward. “Our rehab loan program was a success last year and we have interest this year and the board authorized a $25,000 loan to Doug Pedrick to rehab a home on Linden Avenue,” said Hoiseth. “The townhome project is moving forward with the purchase of the land and we get the tax credits.” There is a meeting on May 27 at the Crookston Inn from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and the public is welcome to meet with state housing officials who will be looking at the townhome project.
Hoiseth said they were looking at the housing stock for sale in the city and they found 13 houses for sale. Four housed in the range of $200,000 and over, five houses for sale are under $90,000 and four houses in the $140,000 to $170,000 range. “There is a concern about the lack of housing and rental apartments for new residents like teachers and new staff at UMC,” said Hoiseth.
The board approved the purchase of the former Elk River property for the housing townhome project at a cost of $200,000 from Keith Danks.


 

CROOKSTON CIVIC ARENA LLC BOARD NEGOTIATING CONTRACT WITH CROOKSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT

The Crookston Civic Arena LLC board met Tuesday morning to work on an agreement with the Crookston School District for their use of the Crookston Sports Center and what the costs should be for the next three years. Crookston Finance Director Angel Weasner explains what was discussed. “Chris Bates, Crookston Schools Superintendent requested that the increase they pay for use of the arena for boys and girls hockey would be 1.4 to 1.8 percent for the next five years,” said Weasner. “In the past it has been a three percent increase for the previous two years and it was zero before that. We need to be able to negotiate with the school district to see what is best for the arena and community.” The motion was to work on a three year agreement with an increase of one to three percent.”
The board agreed to spend time discussing the costs as they realize the value of the sports center to the community when it comes to tourism and the community needs.

 

 

POLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEET AND APPROVE ANNUAL LIQUOR LICENSES, AWARD BIDS

Polk County Commissioners met on Tuesday and Michelle Cote, Director of Property Records, asked for approval for the annual liquor licenses for LakeView Resort, Joe DiMaggio’s Grill and Bar, Snow Sled Inn Bar and Grill and One N’ Only in Euclid. Approval was given.

The 2015 Plat books with maps of all the county townships has been printed and is now available to the public. “We have just finished creating the plat books for 2015 and they are available in the taxpayer service center at the Polk County Government Center for $30,” said Cote. “We had 350 printed and about 50 have been sold and if we run out we will reprint, we plan to print Plat Books every other year.”

A GIS Software update was approved for the Planning and Zoning Administration at a cost of $6,070.00. Morris Electronics was the low bidder at $15,283.81 for electronic storage expansion for the Social Service Department.

Commissioner Joan Lee will represent the county at the Minnesota Land Exchange Board meeting on June 3 in St. Paul as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to overturn the county decision which rejected a land purchase in Rosebud Township. Dean Murphy of Brainerd is the owner with his brother of the property which they wish to sale a habitat perpetual easement to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife and need county approval which was not given earlier this spring. The county is concerned about land which has the forever easement which could have an effect on property taxes.

The commissioners awarded bids for two bridges in Onstad Township to Olson Construction of Thief River Falls at a cost of $100,503.00. The board approved a request from the Red Lake Watershed to add an approach to County Ditch 23 in Bygland Township, Section 14 at the expense of the watershed. They approved the ADA transition plan to match ADA requirements for the highway department.

 

 

BILL PETERSON RETIRING AFTER 47 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE UMC CAMPUS

Bill Peterson, University of Minnesota Crookston professor in the Math, Science and Technology Department retired on Friday after 47 years of service on the campus.
Peterson started at the age of 21 “I came in 1968 to teach math, it was the first year of the two year college so we were developing the program. I also taught physics for about 20 years,” said Peterson. “I worked as a couple of department heads, arts and social science and other department heads. I filled in where needed as I tried to support the campus.”
Peterson said he has noticed a difference in students over the years. “There is a difference in students as the culture has changed from when Dr. Stan Sahlstrom referred to us as a family,” said Peterson. “This is the same, but the demographics have changed with more international students and more from around the country. Over 30 states and 10 or 15 countries at graduation compared to when I came it was Minnesota and North Dakota kids.”
Peterson is seeing several generations of students coming through whose parents went to UMC.
Curriculum changed when the program grew to four years with more calculus, and discreet math and the delivery has changed with the computers.
Peterson started his career with Dr. Stan Sahlstrom and followed through with the others, “Dr. Stan was the founding provost and got our name out and a great leader,” said Peterson. “It was a privilege to work with Don Sargeant as we had an interest in technology, Dr. Casey was a great leader with a vision and commitment to the university and now with Dr. Fred Wood doing a great job we are fortunate to have him as a chancellor.”
Retirement plans include being outside. “After being inside all the time, I will enjoy activities at the lake along with biking and hiking,” said Peterson, who added his wife will work for a few more years.

 

 

 

TUESDAY - MAY 19,  2015

CROOKSTON PARK BOARD TALKS SPLASH PARK AND HAIRBALL WAS A BIG SUCCESS

The Crookston Park Board met on Monday and were pleased to learn the Hairball Concert was a good event for the Crookston Sports Center and the sponsors. “We feel it was a huge success, attendance was great and people enjoyed themselves,” said Park and Recreation Director Scott Riopelle. “The band was fantastic, the sound was good and it went off without a hitch. The band was good to work with, we learned a few things and adapted the facility to easily meet the needs of the event and it was a good time for the community and a lot of dollars were spent.”

An update on the splash park with a design was approved by the Park Board. “We solicited about four different companies and they came up with two to three designs,” said Riopelle. “We went with ARC of Eden Prairie and had designs from companies in Ohio, Wisconsin and British Columbia. The group met today and looked at the seven options and this one was the best and fit the proposed budget and now will go to the city council for final approval.” The committee has raised over $64,000 for the project and has applied to grants from DNR and the Realtors Association. A tank will be purchased to hold the gray water and the water will be used for sprinkling the fields at Highland.

The lights at the Highland Park Tennis courts are in need of repair and Riopelle said they will work on making the changes. “Chris Fee came in and asked if we could upgrade the existing lights at the Highland tennis courts and basketball court on the east end which are used extensively by the community,” said Riopelle. “The basketball court gets hard to see and a lot of people use it so we look to see what we can do to upgrade.”

The Park Board will have a meeting in early June to work on the budget for 2016.

 

 

CROOKSTON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION WILL BE HELD ON FRIDAY AT UMC

Crookston High School Seniors wrap up their high school careers this week with their final day of classes today and Senior Skip Day on Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 7:00 to 11:00 p.m. there will be a bonfire with school transportation for both events.
Graduation festivities on Friday starts with a senior faculty breakfast at 7:30 a.m. followed by graduation practice at 8:15 and the graduation ceremony at 7:00 p.m. in Lysaker gymnasium on the UMC campus. 75 students will receive their diploma and Shlley Thomforde will be the speaker.

 

 

RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY GARDEN GRAND OPENING AND ALLEN PEDERSON BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION TO BE HELD MAY 22

It’s a day for celebration! On Friday, May 22, at noon the community is invited to the grand opening of the Riverside Community Garden and a birthday celebration for Crookston resident and local gardening expert Allen Pedersen on his 99th birthday. The Riverside Community Garden is located in the 400 block of Riverside Drive near the Crookston Community Pool.
For audience comfort, there will be chairs with arm rests available as well as a sound system for easy listening. For information, contact DeAndra O'Connell in the Center for Sustainability at the University of Minnesota Crookston at 218-281-8128.
The community garden contains raised beds, wheelchair accessible beds, a butterfly garden, perennial garden, corn patch, and more.
The Riverside Community Garden project is part of Crookston's new designation as a Minnesota GreenStep City. Minnesota GreenStep Cities is a voluntary challenge, assistance and recognition program to help cities achieve their sustainability and quality-of-life goals. These actions are tailored to all Minnesota cities, focus on cost savings and energy use reduction, and encourage civic innovation.

 

 

CROOKSTON ENVIRONTHON TEAM FINISHES 20TH AT STATE COMPETITION

The Crookston High School Environthon team competed at the state competition held in Cloquet at the Forestry Center and finished 20th place.  "It was a great experience for these students and I'm very proud of their efforts," said Crookston Environthon Advisor Wes Hanson.  A big piece of this years Environthon was Urban/Community Forestry and the team worked together to create a proposal for the long-term implementation or reforestation efforts in a fictitious city in Minnesota.  At the state competition they were scored on the presentation of this proposal as well as stations on aquatics, wildlife, current environmental issues, soils, and forestry.  Team members are Gabi Ostgaard, Callie Boucher, Alex MacGregor, Taylor Perry, Alyssa Schultz.

 

 

QUEEN FOR A DAY WINNER, JEAN LAJESSE, ENJOYS QUEEN FOR A DAY TREATMENT

Jean LaJesse was the lucky winner of this year’s Retail Merchants Association Queen for a Day promotion. She enjoyed a beautiful day in Crookston on Saturday and was chauffeured around town by Ampride Taxi to pick up over $300 worth in prizes. Participating businesses were- Ampride, Christian Brothers Ford, Crookston Chamber, Crookston Daily Times, Four Seasons Clothing, Irishman’s Shanty, KROX, Limited Edition Gift Shop, Rejuv’ Salon & Spa, Willow & Ivy, This is Sew Broadway, and Wish Upon A Star.    
The Retail Merchants Association is a sub-committee of the Crookston Chamber of Commerce sponsoring many events such as this for promotion of community businesses. If you would like to be involved in this committee, please contact the Chamber at 218-4320.


 

SHIRLEY REITMEIER WINS THE CROOKSTON NOON DAY LIONS CLUB DRAWING

The Crookston Noonday Lions Club had their Signature Project raffle drawing during their Meeting on Monday, May 18.  “The Noon Day Lions is very active and periodically we do a Signature Project that we can put are logo and will assist the community, the last signature project we did was the Highland Park Shelter and thought is was time for another one,” said Father Roger Grundhaus, chairman of the raffle committee. “We consulted the chamber and city council about what the city could use and a mobile stage was agreed up for the green space by the pavilion. The raffle was part of the fund raising and it was successful with good participation of the members. We raised $22,240 with $10,000 going for prizes and $12,000 going for the stage, so today we completed the raffle and I am happy with the results.”
The raffle winners were:
Polaris Ranger - Shirley Reitmeier
$500 - John Bjorgo
$250 - Joanne Brunelle.


Shannon Stassen, Shauna Reitmeier, Tom Jorgens, doing the drawing is Keith Fountaine from the Red Lake Falls Lions Club who sold the most tickets, Father Roger Grundhaus, and Gerald Amiot.

 

 

MONDAY - MAY 18,  2015

HAIRBALL CONCERT BRINGS IN 1,274 PEOPLE, FUN HAD BY ALL

The City of Crookston, teaming up with the Crookston Blue Line Club hosted the Hairball concert on Saturday evening and 1,274 people attended the event.  On all reports, everything ran well and a good time was had by all.  "We had excellent feedback from the band and our guests. We had so many people pitch in to help make this concert a reality. This was a nice partnership between the Crookston Blue Line Club and the City of Crookston. A huge thank  you to everyone that volunteered their time," said Crookston City Administrator Shannon Stassen. "In the end, we proved that we can run a good event of this size. We plan to learn from this experience and make the next one even better."


Hairball performing at the arena Saturday night, Picture by Shannon Stassen

 

 

OTTERTAIL POWER COMPANY GIVES $1,000 DONATION TO CROOKSTON LIONS CLUB FOR THE MOBILE STAGE

The Crookston Lions Signature Project received another major donation toward the creation of a mobile event stage for use of the Crookston Community. Today we are recognizing the $1,000 donation from Otter Tail Power Company. Crookston is currently host to many outdoor events each year including: Ox Cart Days, Crazy Days, Nite to Unite, Cornstalk Jamboree and more. The mobile stage will also allow for additional events to blossom in the future. These events improve the quality of life for residents and provide a positive economic impact for the local economy. The goal is to raise $25,000 for this project.
Crookston Lions members are soliciting donations from Crookston Businesses as well as individuals.  The major donations will be recognized on the mobile stage.


Maureen Stay, Customer Service Manager, Leon Kremeier, Area Manager both from Otter Tail, and Tom Jorgens from the Lions.

 

 

TRI-VALLEY FUN BUS COMING BACK TO CROOKSTON AND TRF AND EXPANDING TO MAHNOMEN AND BAGLEY THIS SUMMER

The Tri-Valley Opportunity Council, Inc. Summer Fun Bus is available again in the communities of Crookston and Thief River Falls. Because of the popularity of the service, the communities Mahnomen and Bagley have been added for this summer. Since the program began, numbers have continued to rise which prompted the expansion in service. Summer Fun Bus passes and punch cards are still available in the listed communities by calling Tri-Valley Transportation at 1-800-201-3432.
The Tri-Valley Summer Fun Bus runs from June 1 until August 31 and is for riders aged five to 17. Passes are $55 per child or a maximum of $125 for a family in all of the communities served. Young riders can use the Summer Fun Bus for summer recreation activities, appointments, trips to the library and summer school to name just a few possible options.
Safety comes first on the Tri-Valley Summer Fun Bus. All the children ride in the front of the bus and are dropped off and picked up at their destination or event. In addition, all Tri-Valley buses are equipped with a camera system to help ensure the safety of the passengers and driver.
For more information on Summer Fun Bus passes call 1-800-201-3432 or stop by the Tri-Valley Transit Office in Crookston at 1345 Fairfax Avenue or in Thief River Falls at 524 Barzen Avenue.

 

 

FISHERS LANDING TRAVEL INFORMATION CENTER IS OPEN FOR THE SEASON 

In celebration of National Tourism Week, Fisher’s Landing Travel Information Center on Highway 2 opened May 15 for the season. The staff this year will be Sharon Bergsgaard, Sharon Olson and Gary Ricord. The center will be open 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily.  Everyone is welcome to come out and enjoy our complimentary refreshments while gathering information to “Explore Minnesota” this summer.   The travel center is important to Crookston and the area.
Travelers in Minnesota spend more than $35 million per day. These dollars circulate widely into Minnesota’s local and state economies, supporting businesses and amenities that add to Minnesotans quality of life.  Every $1 invested in state tourism marketing returns an estimated $8 in state and local taxes and $84 in spending by travelers.
In Polk County alone there were $52,913,882 spent in gross sales, $2,813.47 in state sales tax and 1,074 private sector jobs attributed to the Leisure and Hospitality Industry in 2013.
In Crookston, top attractions for visitors include the Crookston Sports Center hosting sporting events throughout the seasons, the Polk County Historical Museum, wildlife viewing on the many wildlife refuges that surround our community, UMC’s floral and butterfly gardens, Veterans Memorial Walkway, our unique shopping; and of course the  Crookston also made the “top 20 list” on Trails.com for birding in Minnesota.
Vacations and getaways benefit the travelers who take them, of course, but tourism also benefits the communities these travelers visit, including Crookston.
 

 

 

RED LAKE COUNTY FARMERS INVITED TO CROP UPDATE MEETING ON MAY 19

Most farmers in Red Lake County have had very good conditions for spring seeding this year.  To help farmers keep their crops going in the right direction; the Red Lake County Extension Office and the County Cooperative fertilizer plant are having two informational meetings.
These two informal meetings will be held at the Red Lake County fertilizer plant at the south end of town on County Highway 11 in Red Lake Falls. The first program will be held Tuesday, May 19 stating at 8:30 a.m. and will be conducted by Jochum Wiersma, University Minnesota Small Grains Specialist. He will provide update information on the conditions of the small grains crop and then respond to grower concerns and issues.
The second meeting will be held at the same location and time on Tuesday June 2nd and will be conducted by Madeleine Smith, U of M Extension Plant Pathologist and Phil Glogoza, U of M Crops Extension Educator. Both presenters will talk about the conditions of the small grains and soybean crops and then respond to grower concerns and issues. Both meetings are free of charge to all interested persons and are sponsored by the University of Minnesota Extension, Red Lake County Extension Office and the Red Lake County Cenex Cooperative. For more information, contact Doug Knott Manager of the Cooperative at 218-253-2149.   

 

 

 

MOTORISTS ON HIGHWAY NINE BETWEEN ADA AND CROOKSTON WILL BE DETOURED STARTING MAY 18

Motorists on Highway 9 between Borup and Beltrami will experience staged detours beginning Monday, May 18, as crews begin bridge rehabilitation on five bridges on Highway 9. The first stage of the detours will begin on May 18, with Highway 9 detoured between Ada and Crookston. Motorists driving south on Highway 9 from Crookston will proceed southeast on Highway 102 for nineteen miles, and then follow Highway 32 southbound for eighteen miles. Motorists will then proceed eleven miles west on Highway 200 to Ada.
Motorists on Highway 2 westbound who are going to Ada via Crookston will follow Highway 32 south from Marcoux 33 miles, and then proceed westbound on Highway 200 eleven miles to Ada.
This detour is expected to conclude around June 15, weather permitting.
Crews will be repairing and maintaining bridges along the route, necessitating the detour. This project will ensure that Highway 9 in Norman County will be a safer and smoother roadway for many years to come. For statewide travel information, visit www.511mn.org.        

 

 

SUNDAY - MAY 17,  2015

MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WARNS NO EDUCATION BILL THIS SESSION WILL BE A DISASTER

Date: May 16, 2015

Reporters and Editors – For your background, this morning during the Governor’s news conference, he was asked what would happen if no E-12 Education Budget Bill is enacted this session. This afternoon, MMB Commissioner Myron Frans and Education Commissioner Brenda Cassellius issued the attached memo to members of the press, highlighting just some of the catastrophic consequences of failing to enact an Education Bill this session. See the attached memo for more information.

To: Members of the Press
From:
Commissioner Myron Frans, Minnesota Management and Budget Commissioner Brenda Cassellius, Minnesota Department of Education
Subject:
Consequences of No E-12 Education Budget Bill In response to a question that was raised this morning by members of the press, we wanted to present the reporters and Minnesotans with the facts on what would in fact happen if no Omnibus E-12 Budget Bill is enacted this session. The consequences of not enacting an E-12 Education Budget Bill would be catastrophic for our schools, our teachers, and most importantly our students.

Here is what you need to know:
· Shut Down Minnesota Department of Education – Without an Education Bill, the Minnesota Department of Education would shut down – laying off over 400 state employees.
· No Way to Process Payments to Schools – The employees and IT systems at the Minnesota Department of Education that process payments to schools would not be funded without an Education Bill.
· Only the General Education and Debt Service Formulas are Funded in Statute – Even though the general education formula and debt service formulas are funded in statute, all other funding formulas such as special education, and programs like early learning scholarships and ECFE are not funded in statute. Therefore, major sources of essential funding for school operations would discontinue, putting essential programming statewide at risk.
· Teacher and Staff Layoffs – Without an Education Bill, there would be no increase in the funding formula for school districts – which would by itself force schools to make major cuts and lay off teachers and other essential staff. But without other essential funding sources for education, schools would face other major funding cuts that would cause even further layoffs.
· Shutdown Scenario for MMB – Minnesota Management and Budget would need to seek authorization from the courts, similar to the 2011 shutdown, to make education payments to schools. In 2011, the courts did not determine all of education funding to be critical.
· Shutdown Board of Teaching and Board of School Administrators – Without a court order, the Board of Teaching and Board of School Administrators would be shut down, and the state would then be unable to process teaching licenses and perform other critical functions for teachers and school districts statewide at its most critical time for a successful school start.
· Shutdown Minnesota State Academies for the Deaf and Blind, and the Perpich School – Without a court order, the state academies for blind and deaf students would shut down. The Perpich Center for Arts Education would also shut down. These are just some of the consequences of not enacting an E-12 Education Bill this session.

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA EXTENSION OFFERS LAWNMOWING TIPS

Lawn Mowing Season is Here

Lawn mowing is perhaps the most important practice performed in home lawn care. The simple practice of mowing impacts not only the appearance of your lawn, but also can impact the turf’s ability to ward off problems.
Regardless of whether the lawn is fertilized, irrigated or other management practices, proper mowing practices are essential for a high quality lawn. Properly mowed lawns will have fewer weeds, will better withstand mid-summer moisture stress and will have a more pleasing appearance.
Regular mowing with a sharp mower blade at the proper mower height keeps grass growing vigorously and maintains adequate plant density to thoroughly cover the soil surface. Continually scalping turf seriously weakens grass plants, leaving an opening for weed invasion.
Mowing too short creates problems. For most lawns, mowing at a height of 2½ to 3½ inches screens out light to the soil surface, thus preventing weeds (such as light-loving crabgrass seeds) from germinating. Also, a higher cutting height encourages slightly deeper root systems, allowing them to gather moisture and nutrients from a larger soil volume, thereby increasing a grass plant’s stress tolerance. If your grass has become very long (e.g., during extended rainy periods), lower the mower blade height gradually rather than cutting grass back all at once to reduce unnecessary stress on plants.
Mulching mowers and mulching attachments for mowers reduce the size of grass clippings, thus increasing the rate at which they decompose. And mowing on a regular basis with a sharp mower blade produces clippings that decompose fairly quickly. Allow these clippings to remain on the lawn whenever possible. They do not contribute to thatch build-up because when they decompose they become a valuable organic source of nutrients for grass plants. In fact, yearly nitrogen applications may be reduced by 1/3 to 1/2 when grass clippings are left on the lawn. However, remove clippings that form large clumps on top of the grass. Moreover, mulching the clippings will also save the time in clipping removal. Turf mowed with the new mulching mowers has grass that has nearly the same swept or vacuumed appearance as when the turf surface was mowed with bagging attachments.
The direction of mowing should be altered every one to two mowings. Mowing at right angles (90 degrees) to the previous direction will help prevent the grass from repeatedly being pushed in one direction, an important consideration at high mowing heights. Also if scalping areas of the lawn is a problem, the different mowing directions will help minimize continual scalping in any one area.
All mowing equipment should be kept in good working condition. Having the mower serviced prior to the heavy spring mowing period will help ensure routine, maintenance-free mowing. Mower blades should be sharpened each spring and as needed during the season. A dull mower blade frays the ends of blades and results in brown tips which are unsightly and indicate damaged turfgrass.
Turfgrass should be mowed when it is dry. Wet grass is more difficult to cut and has the tendency to clog under rotary mowers. Mowing should not, however, be delayed for long periods of time because the grass is wet.
For more information, contact Jim Stordahl at 800-450-2465 or stordahl@umn.edu.   Sources: UMN, NDSU and OSU.

 

 

FRIDAY - MAY 15,  2015

CROOKSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT HOLDS RECEPTION FOR RETIRING TEACHERS

The Crookston School District hosted a reception for several teachers and staff who are retiring at the end of the school year on Thursday. Retirees include Don Dahl, Diane Frisk, Emily Harrington, Mary LaFrance, Shirley Simonson, Jean Tester and Marla Wolfe. Shirley Simonson has taught social studies for 28 years. “I have taught in every building, seventh through 12th grade, teaching social studies at all levels,” said Simonson. “Now we use the new technology and make the study more interesting which the kids like and they help teach me, my replacement will be great with the students. I will miss teaching and will probably sub, retirement means we can visit our daughter in Hawaii next winter.”
Mary LaFrance is retiring from her art teaching position and was also honored as the teacher of the year early this month.


Marla Wolfe, Shirley Simonson and Mary Lafrance at the reception (Picture by CHS)


 

THIS WEEK IS NATIONAL POLICE WEEK AND TODAY IS NATIONAL PEACE OFFICERS MEMORIAL DAY

This week is National Police Week and today is National Peace Officers Memorial Day where those who died in the line of service are honored. As part of National Police Week, KROX interviewed Crookston Police Officer Travis Halverson, who is an investigator and has been with the department for 15 years. “It will be 15 years in August and started as a patrolman on the road for about nine years,” said Halvorson. “I was a school resource officer at the school for 2 years and then with the Pine to Prairie Drug Task Force for five years and now two years as an investigator.”
Investigators wear plain clothes and work Monday through Friday and are subject to call out anytime to cover all cases. “With investigations we assist the patrolmen and have more resources,” said Halvorson. “We work with social service on child protection, burglaries, predator offenders, process death scenes, we had training along with the investigation job with first witness training, forensics interviews with juveniles and children, crime scene processing, death scene processing and will attend the death conference for more training.
Detective Sergeant Aaron Pry is also an investigator in Crookston. Halverson has a wife and two children. The investigators work closely with other agencies including federal, state and local departments in joint investigations.


 

HAIRBALL CONCERT EXPECTING OVER 1,000 PEOPLE, PARKING AND EVENT INFORMATION TIPS OFFERED

Over 1000 people are expected to attend Hairball on Saturday at the Crookston Sports Center. The concert committee would like to share important information for concert goers.

Parking
Local attendees are encouraged to car pool whenever possible to allow space for our out of town guests.

-Crookston Sports Center Lot - $5 per vehicle and will receive pass that must be visible
-Vehicles without a pass will be ticketed during the concert
-VIP ticket holders will have FREE parking near the east building entrance
-Taxi cabs and other drop offs will be allowed at the east building entrance
-Overflow parking is available at Crookston High School. A free shuttle will be available and riders should expect to experience a wait after the concert.
-Free parking will be allowed on Pirate Drive east of Drafts Sports Bar and along the frontage road.

Small bags and purses are subject to search. Please no large bags. No food or beverages are allowed to be brought into the building.

 

 

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR - GREATER MN COUNTIES: LOCAL ROADS AND LONG-TERM FUNDING THIS YEAR

Ask someone if they want their gas tax raised and they will act as if you just offered to give them the measles. It's not a very popular topic. People watch gas prices the way hawks watch field mice.
But as hard as it may be to swallow, Greater Minnesota needs significant new long-term, reliable and constitutionally dedicated revenues to establish a foothold on the growing mountain of transportation needs that stand between it and the competitive market.
Because of the shift to a metro majority in the Legislature, Greater Minnesota needs to lock-in the constitutional protections afforded to a higher gas tax, tab fees, and motor vehicle sales tax.
Due to the particular politics of transportation funding and how the formula works, we need the calculations of that increased gas tax shifted from a per-gallon basis that will decline over time, to a sales tax that will capture future growth - otherwise known as the Gross Receipts Tax.
And because Greater Minnesota has fallen so far behind, it needs virtually any other revenues available, just to keep pace with growing road and bridge demands .
This is especially apparent at the local level where the critical first link out of the fields or forests are locked in time-warp standards from the middle of the last century.
All of these changes need to happen, and they need to happen this year.
People are not surprised to hear the local road system is the backbone of the rural economy , but they might not have considered its broader value to the state and nation.
Like the humble beginnings of the Mighty Mississippi, local roads are the wellspring to a food and agriculture industry that generates over $3 billion in state exports annually.
They are a direct and vital delivery system supporting 24 percent of rural jobs and a full 13 percent of metro jobs in Fortune 500 companies like Supervalu, CHS, General Mills, Land O' Lakes, Hormel Foods, The Mosaic Co., and Ecolab.
The reality is, because of a tweak in the last gas tax bill in 2008, funding considerations for local roads in greater Minnesota were weakened by a shift to populated metro areas.
That, along with the concurrent market crash and a huge spike in the cost of materials, meant many counties in Greater Minnesota did not share equally in the benefits of increased highway funding revenues provided by the bill.
Since 2002 , we've been working toward a goal of building a statwide,10-ton interlinking local highway system that would save time, money and trips for farmers who race the clock and weather during spring planting and fall harvest, and timber haulers in the forested areas - but we're not even close to completion.
To begin planning a competitive system, our county engineers and local transportation leaders need significant new long term, dedicated and reliable funding that is distributed through the Highway Users Tax Distribution fund, as a foundation to begin addressing the deep deficiencies they face.

How much do they need? The Minnesota Transportation Finance Advisory Committee recommends $28.5 billion over the next 20 years to bring local roads (counties, cities and townships) to economically competitive/world class standards.
We appreciate the one-time surplus money, tax shifts from existing programs , and bonding offered in the Minnesota House proposal, because those funds will absolutely work to supplement the constitutionally protected and dedicated gas tax, tab fee and motor vehicle sales tax increase included in the senate and Governor's proposal.
It's a little indelicate, but the stark reality of transportation politics ties Greater Minnesota support for the metro sales tax for transit , to metro support for adequate road fund ing.
Support by metro legislators for adequate road funding in Greater Minnesota through an increased gas tax and the other methods on the table goes away - maybe forever - once funding for metro transit is addressed.
Legislative leadership is aligned to do something this year on transportation , and we have one-time metro support for the protected, increased funding necessary to begin to do the job.
What we get this year in road funding is what we get for a long , long time. Our message must start with new money, protected against the whims of future legislatures by the power of the constitution.

Todd Miller
MRCC Chairman
Roseau County Commissioner

 

 

THURSDAY - MAY 14,  2015

THE UMC CAMPUS IS STILL A BUSY PLACE, EVEN WITH SCHOOL DISMISSED FOR THE SUMMER

The University of Minnesota Board of Regents met recently and are working on a bonding bill that would include a project for the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC). “They want to help expand our undergraduate research base, the number of freshman students have doubled that want to grow to graduate school, going from 20 percent to 46 percent of the class,” said UMC Chancellor Dr.  Fred Wood. “The faculty wants to continue the modest scholarship so we will need to remodel the area.” 

Summer projects have started on the UMC campus.  “The Wellness Center is the big project with the trees down and they will start laying the foundation and with good weather through the winter they will get the structure up and be ready to open in the fall of 2016,” said Chancellor Wood.  “There will be lots of cabling on the campus with equipment as they redo the electrical infrastructure of the campus as it is over 50 years old so safety is a concern.”

There are some smaller projects with AURI moving to the Valley Technology Park. “We will convert the area to admissions, which we toured recently with the College Advisory and Advancement Board and former Senator Roger Moe, who worked with AURI, so there is plenty of work to do,” said Wood.

 

 

CROOKSTON NOON DAY LIONS CLUB TO HOLD RANGER RAFFLE DRAWING MAY 18

Just a few days left to get a chance on the Polaris Ranger as the Grand Prize, the $500 second prize and $25 third prize. The drawing will take place at the Lions meeting at noon on Monday, May 18.  The Polaris Ranger is on display at Ampride Convenience Store where they still have raffle tickets.
The Crookston Noon Day Lions Club signature project will ultimately lead to the creation of a mobile event stage. Crookston is currently host to many outdoor events each year including: Ox Cart Days, Crazy Days, Nite to Unite, Cornstalk Jamboree and more. The mobile stage will also allow for additional events to blossom in the future. These events improve the quality of life for residents and provide a positive economic impact for the local economy. The goal is to raise $25,000 for this project.

 

 

UMC HANDS OUT FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

Faculty and Staff Day was held at the conclusion of spring semester at the University of Minnesota Crookston and celebrated excellence and service by members of the faculty and staff. Chancellor Fred Wood and Deb Zak, regional director, U of M Extension, served as hosts for the annual event. 

Those recognized with special awards 
included Margot Rudstrom, instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department for Distinguished Teaching; Don Cavalier, director of Career Development and Counseling, as Distinguished Civil Service/Bargaining Unit; and Jason Tangquist, assistant athletic director, as Distinguished P&A. 

The award for Outstanding Community Service went to Deb Zak, regional director, U of M Extension. The Access Achievement Award was presented to Nancy Shay, teaching specialist, in the Math, Science & Technology Department. 

The Builder of Diversity Award was presented to Soo-Yin Lim-Thompson, associate professor and interim department head, for the Liberal Arts & Education Department; and the RSVP Boomerang Award went to Diane Rapacz, principal office and administrative specialist, in the Center for Adult Learning, for her work as a volunteer with RSVP’s Groceries to Go program.

Also recognized were those reaching years of service milestones and retirements, including Bill Peterson (pictured right), professor in the Math, Science, and Technology Department, who was recognized for his 47 years of service to the University on his retirement. 


Distinguished Service Don Cavalier - Distinguished Teaching Margot Rudstrom


Builder of Diversity – Soo-Yin Lim-Thompson, Access Achievement Award – Nancy Shay, and Outstanding Community Service- Deb Zak


RSVP Boomerang Award – Diane Rapacz




CATHEDRAL SCHOOL STUDENTS TO PRESENT THEIR SPRING PLAY MAY 14


The Cathedral School will present Back to the Cross+, Thursday, May 14 at 7:00 p.m. in the Cathedral Church.  Everyone is welcome to attend.

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY - MAY 13,  2015

CITY OF CROOKSTON AND TRI-VALLEY HOUSING PARTNERSHIP MOVING FORWARD ON MORE HOUSING IN TOWN

The Crookston Ways and Means Committee met on Monday and had a presentation from Chris Flood of the Three Rivers Community Action group in Zumbrota.  Flood has worked on many housing projects throughout the state and is assisting Crookston in getting a 30 housing unit project. “I’m here to help them navigate the regulations the state has to get the funding through the federal program called housing tax credit to bring private equity and investment to affordable projects throughout the country,” said Flood.  This project is $6.5 million and the city has to come up with about $500,000 to show that Crookston is serious about the project. “We will show the need for housing through the housing study done in 2013 and we will have a market study for this particular project,” said Flood. “We will apply this year and if we don’t get it we will keep applying until it is approved.”
The committee approved $200,000 to purchase five acres of the former Elk River Concrete property for the building site. It is planned to get the grant application completed in June.

 


CITY OF CROOKSTON TO GET A GRANT FROM THE NW MN FOUNDATION AND CHANGES MADE TO ORDINANCES

The Crookston City Council learned this week that a grant applied for was received for the Building and Inspection Department to update the Planning Commission organization. “We applied for a community planning grant from the Northwest Minnesota Foundation for $7,500, but after visiting we got to add in kind and got it to $9,485.00 and heard today it was approved,” said Matt Johnson, Crookston Building Inspector. “The final passage of Ordinance 56 amending zoning was approved for the former Elk River Site for the housing project that was recently discussed.  The health and safety ordinance change was introduced and has to do with the junk amendment to allow us to assess an administrative fee based on inspection based on the repeat offenders.”

 

 

CHANCELLOR WOOD ATTENDS THE LATEST U OF M BOARD OF REGENTS MEETING

University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC) commencement was held over the weekend and UMC Chancellor Dr. Fred Wood said the event turned out well. “It was wonderful and the weather was terrific,” said Wood. “Over 200 participated with more than double that graduating since last fall.”
Dr. Wood attended the University of Minnesota Board of Regents meeting recently with a focus on the Twin Cities campus and the promotion of three UMC professors.  “UMC had three faculty up for promotion, Eric Castle and Katy Nannenga were promoted to associate professor and Soo-Yin Lim-Thompson was promoted to professor,” said Wood. “This is a good mark for them.”
The next bonding bill was discussed to get UMC a project to help expand the undergraduate research base which has doubled and the need to remodel. President Kaler mentioned that our admission numbers are up for next fall.

 

 

MAYOR GARY WILLHITE AND THE CITY COUNCIL HONOR POLICE AND HOSPITALS WITH PROCLAMATIONS

The Crookston City Council and Mayor Gary Willhite had two proclamations this week at their meeting on Monday.  It was proclaimed National Police Week and Police Chief Paul Biermaier invited several of the police officers to the meeting along with retired Chief Tim Motherway and the wives of two former chief’s Gale Regan and Dennis Hogenson.
A proclamation declaring the week National Hospital Week was signed also with Carrie Michalski, RiverView Health executive director and members of the staff in attendance.   First graders from Cathedral school and their teacher Laurie Erickson presented a poster to the police officers thanking them for protecting the residents of the city.


                  The Crookston Police during the National Police week proclamation


                    RiverView Health staff during the National Hospital Week Proclamation

 

 

CROOKSTON FIREFIGHTERS ASSOCIATION TO RENOVATE THEIR POLE SHED

The Crookston Firefighters Association came before the Crookston Ways and Means Committee with a request to renovate the building next to the fire hall to better meet the needs of the department. “The request was for funds to renovate the pole shed into a year round facility so we have room to expand,” said Chris Cournia, volunteer fireman. “The request is from the firefighters association with 25 volunteer firemen that serve 13 townships.”
The committee agreed to commit $30,000 from the Municipal Land Fund for the project and borrow the association $50,000 in a interest free loan to complete the project this summer.

 

 FOR THE OBITUARY PAGE  CLICK HERE

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